Bahrain more dangerous than US for cops - report

Analysis finds Bahraini police officers are 116 times more likely to die on the job than in the UK

Three years of violent protests in Bahrain has elevated the island kingdom to one of the most dangerous locations to be a police officer, according to an analysis by local daily Gulf Daily News.

Police in Bahrain are 116 times more likely to die in the line of duty than they are in the UK and eight times more likely than US officers, who face widespread gun ownership, according to the per capita death rate of serving officers during 2011-2013.

Twelve Bahraini police officers have died and 2,300 have been injured on the job since anti-government protests broke out in March 2011, according to police statistics.

Three officers died in one attack Monday last week. They were killed when a bomb exploded in Daih in what was the single deadliest attack on police since unrest began.

It came only two weeks after policeman Abdulwaheed Al Balooshi, a 29-year old father-to-be, died from injuries he suffered in a series of bombings targeting police on February 14, the third anniversary of the uprising.

The GDN calculated that one policeman had died for every 325,000 Bahraini residents each of the past three years.

During the same period, a total of five British police officers had been killed in the line of duty - or one officer for every 37.8m British residents each year.

In the US, 374 officers had died in the past three years, equating to one officer per nearly 2.5m US residents each year.

Bahrain is the only GCC nation to experience violent anti-government protests since the Arab Spring.

The Shia-dominated opposition is calling for a constitutional monarchy and equality in the Sunni-ruled kingdom.

Talks between parties have repeatedly stalled.

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