Educating business minds

University of Wollongong is one of a number of institutions helping to shape keen minds – young and old – in the UAE. Dean of the Faculty of Business, Professor Valerie Lindsay, explains what’s on offer for those looking to develop their business brains.

There are no age limits to learning, especially in business.

Some of the brightest and longest-standing businessmen and women go to great lengths to increase their knowledge, especially in such a fast-moving environment.

For young students starting from scratch, and for established business owners, there is great value in getting and staying educated. Something the UAE caters for well, with a wealth of schools, colleges, universities and workshops designed to get the best out of both aspiring and inspiring business leaders.

One of the universities leading the way in business education is the University of Wollongong Dubai (UOWD), which offers students a variety of different courses at bachelors, masters and doctoral levels.

The courses provide various levels of depth, with undergraduate BBA and BCom degrees providing learners with a broad knowledge base and skills set, postgraduate and MBA courses focusing on more particular business functions, and DBA and PhD courses offering the opportunity for even more rigorous examinations of certain issues.

And judging by the number of people signing up to business courses, it seems the lure of a business education is increasingly attractive to young people.

Dean of the Faculty of Business, Professor Valerie Lindsay, explains that out of a student population of 4,000 at UOWD, more than three quarters are enrolled in business programmes, and that there has been a steady year on year increase.

“The increase in people looking for a business education is set against the business landscape of the UAE’s growing knowledge economy,” she explains.

“Dubai in particular has a strong business base in a range of growth sectors such as finance, technology, logistics and media. A broad business education, as well as specialisations in selected fields, provides the platform to enter and progress in these expanding industries.

“The country’s need for highly skilled personnel who can operate in a competitive, globalised environment means that business education is in increasing demand.”

The link between business education and business proper must, therefore, be incredibly close.

Lindsay confirms UOWD has a “dynamic relationship” with national and international business communities, which manifests itself through a range of initiatives including research, curriculum development and interactions between students and the industry.

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