Egypt's interim gov't gets to work amid protests

  • Share via facebook
  • Tweet this
  • Bookmark and Share
Interim head of state Adli Mansour.

Interim head of state Adli Mansour.

Egypt's interim government sets about the mammoth task of returning the country to civilian rule and rescuing the economy on Wednesday, a process complicated by deadly protests and a political stalemate with powerful Islamist groups.

Interim head of state Adli Mansour, the burly judge leading the army-backed administration, swore in 33 mainly liberal and technocratic ministers at the presidential palace on Tuesday.

He did not include a single minister representing either of Egypt's main Islamist groups that have won five straight elections since 2011.

Islamist President Mohamed Mursi was ousted by the military on July 3 after millions took to the streets to demand his resignation. Mursi's Muslim Brotherhood movement insists he be returned to power before it joins the political process.

The Brotherhood rejected the interim government led by Mansour and Prime Minister Hazem el-Beblawi, a veteran liberal economist.

"It's an illegitimate government, an illegitimate prime minister, an illegitimate cabinet," said Brotherhood spokesman Gehad El-Haddad. "We don't recognise anyone in it. We don't even recognise their authority as representatives of the government."

The ministers took up their posts hours after seven people were killed and more than 260 wounded when Brotherhood supporters clashed with police in central Cairo and nearby Giza.

The deaths took the number of people killed in clashes since Mursi's overthrow to at least 99.

The confrontations are increasingly polarising society between those who support the military intervention and those who oppose it.

As well as violence and political infighting, the interim government must also drag the Egyptian economy out of its torpor, after two and a half years of upheaval left state coffers and food stocks running dangerously low.

Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Kuwait - rich Gulf Arab monarchies happy to see the fall of the Brotherhood - have promised a total of $12 billion in cash, loans and fuel.

But investors are sceptical that major reforms can be enacted before a permanent government is in place. Parliamentary elections are expected to be held in about six months.

Article continued on next page...

Related:
Topics
Join the Discussion

Disclaimer:The view expressed here by our readers are not necessarily shared by Arabian Business, its employees, sponsors or its advertisers.

Please post responsibly. Commenter Rules

  • No comments yet, be the first!

Enter the words above: Enter the numbers you hear:

All comments are subject to approval before appearing

Further reading

Features & Analysis
Women edge into Gulf boardrooms as economies, societies shift

Women edge into Gulf boardrooms as economies, societies shift

Amina al-Rustamani, CEO of TECOM Investments, is leading the...

2
Concerned for stability, Saudi Arabia tightens curbs on dissent

Concerned for stability, Saudi Arabia tightens curbs on dissent

Gulf kingdom intensifies crackdown on domestic dissent, raising...

Frustrated Kuwaitis ask, why is Kuwait falling behind?

Frustrated Kuwaitis ask, why is Kuwait falling behind?

Citizens wonder why oil producer Kuwait is not as dynamic a hub...

4
Most Discussed
  • 54
    Three UAE women attacked with hammer at London hotel

    I really feel that Arabian Business.Com should now close this comments page. This should be all about sympathy for the families not what it is/has turned... more

    Wednesday, 16 April 2014 1:06 PM - Adrienne
  • 51
    Why Dubai isn't a plastic city

    What is definitely not a plastic city. The Arabs have a culture dating back to several centuries. 50 years back Dubai was just a fishing village. Today... more

    Tuesday, 8 April 2014 3:49 PM - P. MADHUSUDAN
  • 48
    DMCC boss Ahmed Bin Sulayem entertains Robert Mugabe in Dubai

    @fga ''However today, simply because he decided to dispossess a few white farmers of their land and redistribute to the poorer indigenous blacks'' more

    Sunday, 13 April 2014 3:02 PM - Matt Williams