Kuwait MPs call for mixed coffee shops to be closed

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(photo for illustrative purposes only)

(photo for illustrative purposes only)

Kuwaiti lawmakers have called for a debate in parliament on what they have deemed the “moral menace” of mixed coffee shops which allow men and women to interact together, with a rally taking place at the weekend calling for the outlets to be shut down, it was reported.

“We will not hesitate to grill the competent ministers if these immoral coffee shops are not shut down within one month,” MP Askar Al Enezi was quoted as saying by local Kuwaiti media.

“We urge the ministers of interior, commerce and municipality to take action against these cafés all over Kuwait, but particularly in the Jahra area,” he added.

MPs and religious leaders took part in a rally on Saturday calling for the coffee shops, where men and women have been spotted smoking shisha together, to be closed. MPs deemed the outlets to be a “moral menace” and called for a debate on the issue in parliament.

“Such coffee shops have no room in our society as they violate our very traditions and customs as well as the spirit of the Constitution which stipulates the state's responsibility in maintaining the values of the family considered as the core of the community and in protecting the youth,” MP Sultan Al Laghisem told the Al Jareeda newspaper.

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Posted by: rednrosy

I think these lawmakers are the actual Moral Menace.

Trying to create social tensions and forcing people to take sides instead of an adult discussion.

reminds me of the "you are either with us or against us" doctrine.

Posted by: Brock

It starts with a "coffee shops" and soon enough we will having separate entrances for males and females everywhere. Looks like Kuwait is moving back to the Dark Ages. The MPs may be insinuating Shisha joints but make no mistake, a small spark sets a forest ablaze.

Posted by: Abdullah

I think the word ?coffee shops? is vague in this article. There are ?coffee shops? or accurately ?shisha cafes? that pose as fronts for prostitution rings and are situated in residential areas where the prostitutes parade their wares like it is Amsterdam. This is inappropriate for a GCC nation to allow such cafes to be run openly. It is the authorities that are at fault and I think what these MP?s want is the government to clamp down on these establishments. I don?t think they are speaking about Starbucks, but what AK is insinuating is that there is a broader agenda by Islamic MP?s to scrutinize the social fabric of Kuwait society which wants an open society, considering Kuwaitis are viewed as the most liberal in the Gulf. It is important to note that issues dealing with Jahra, are isolated to Jahra, and most of the technocrat/modern Kuwaitis don?t care about Jahra matters.

Posted by: Gere

Please fellas, just let em do what they want. Let em be. It's their town and their lives. We do our stuff, they do theirs. Why is it a concern to us. When they pass into obscurity no one will notice or care and any moment of thought on them and their behavior, culture or country are wasted moments.

Posted by: A.K.

Would appreciate if the article contained the other side of the argument. The vast majority of Kuwait's population do not mind and infact may prefer "mixed" coffeshops, restaurants and any public place. This is a small minority of MPs who are trying to impose their personal preferences on the society. Kuwait has always had an open free society where men and woman can go and wear whatever they wished. Women are highly respected, wether religious or liberal and hold key governmental and business positions

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