Chinese pollution kills fish

Hundreds of thousands of fish have been killed after chemical discharge flowed into the Fuhe river in Wuhan, China. The dead fish surfaced in the Hubei province following the latest industrial accident to pollute the countrys environment.
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A resident clears dead fish from the Fuhe River in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province on September 3, 2013 after large amounts of dead fish began to be surface early the day before. According to local media, about 30 thousand kilograms of dead fish had been cleared by late September 2. The official Wuhan municipal government's emergency office Weibo account announced on September 3 that the fish had died of severely high levels of ammonia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Dead fish are cleared from the Fuhe River in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province on September 3, 2013 after large amounts of dead fish began to be surface early the day before. According to local media, about 30 thousand kilograms of dead fish had been cleared by late September 2. The official Wuhan municipal government's emergency office Weibo account announced on September 3 that the fish had died of severely high levels of ammonia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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This picture taken on September 3, 2013 shows a fisherman looking at the dead fish floating on the Fuhe River in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province after large amounts of dead fish began to be surface early the day before. Hundreds of thousands of dead fish were left floating in the Chinese river after a chemical discharge, officials said on September 4, the latest industrial accident to pollute the country's battered environment. (AFP/Getty Images)
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People salvage dead fish in a river on September 3, 2013 in Wuhan, Hubei province of China. About 40 kilometers of Fuhe River was covered with dead fish and most of them are 40 to 50 cm long. It was reported that the incident was caused by excessive ammonia nitrogen density. (Getty Images)
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Dead fish are seen floating on the Fuhe River in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province on September 3, 2013 after large amounts of dead fish began to be surface early the day before. According to local media, about 30 thousand kilograms of dead fish had been cleared by late September 2. The official Wuhan municipal government's emergency office Weibo account announced on September 3 that the fish had died of severely high levels of ammonia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Dead fish are cleared from the Fuhe River in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei province on September 3, 2013 after large amounts of dead fish began to be surface early the day before. According to local media, about 30 thousand kilograms of dead fish had been cleared by late September 2. The official Wuhan municipal government's emergency office Weibo account announced on September 3 that the fish had died of severely high levels of ammonia. (Getty Images)
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People salvage dead fish in a river on September 3, 2013 in Wuhan, Hubei province of China. About 40 kilometers of Fuhe River was covered with dead fish and most of them are 40 to 50 cm long. It was reported that the incident was caused by excessive ammonia nitrogen density. (Getty Images)