Greenpeace tests water in Manila Bay

Greenpeace activists have teamed up with scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) to conduct water sampling in Manila Bay in the Philippines. Domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail', turning Manila Bay into a giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances.
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The Greenpeace ship, Esperanza lies in waters off Manila Bay on July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Water sampling conducted by scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace has found high traces of domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, which converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace activists conduct water sampling on Manila Bay July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace activists conduct water sampling on Manila Bay July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Fishermen watch the Greenpeace ship Esperanza anchored off Manila Bay on July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Water sampling conducted by scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace has found high traces of domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, which converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace activists conduct water sampling on Manila Bay July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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A fisherman's shanty lie in the polluted and garbage filled waters in Manila Bay on July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Water sampling conducted by scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace has found high traces of domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, which converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Children swim in polluted waters off Manila Bay July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Water sampling conducted by scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace has found high traces of domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, which converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)
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Scientists from the University of the Philippines-Marine Science Institute (UP-MSI) along with Greenpeace activists conduct water sampling on Manila Bay July 23, 2013 in Manila, Philippines. Domestic sewage, toxic industrial waste, leachate from garbage dumps, and runoff from chemical agriculture, converge into what Greenpeace describe as a 'hideous cocktail' reducing Manila Bay into one giant waste dump. Overfishing is also prevalent in the bay with commercial fish cages and small fishers competing for dwindling fish and marine resources that scientists claim already contain high levels of heavy metals and toxic substances. (Getty Images)