Hindus celebrate Holi festival

The Hindu festival of Holi has been celebrated across India and by devotees around the world, using a palette of vibrant colours to mark the festival which signifies the victory of good over evil, the arrival of spring, and an opportunity to mend damaged relationships. In a break from tradition, widows have been allowed to enjoy the full celebrations in some communities. Previously widows were considered social outcasts and not allowed to enjoy the colourful exuberance.
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Indian widows dressed as Hindu god Lord Krishna and Radha dance with Sulabh International founder Bindeshwari Pathak (2nd R) during Holi celebrations in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Indian widow rests celebrating Holi with water and gulal (coloured powder) in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Indian widows celebrate Holi with water and gulal (coloured powder) in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Indian widows dressed as Hindu god Lord Krishna and Radha dance as Sulabh International founder Bindeshwari Pathak (R) sprinkles flower petals during Holi celebrations in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Indian widow prays while sitting next to trays of gulal (colored powder) during Holi celebrations in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Indian widows living in Vrindavan separate flower petals before celebrating Holi with Gulal (coloured powder), flowers and water in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Indian widows sing and dance while playing Holi with gulal (coloured powder), flowers and water in Vrindavan on March 14, 2014. Breaking centuries-old tradition, around 1,000 widows living in the holy city of Vrindavan celebrated the spring colour festival of Holi at Meera Sahabhagini Sadan in Vrindavan. In a symbolic gesture, the widows celebrated Holi with colours and gulal unlike the previous year where they only sprinkled flower petals over each other. As per Indian tradition, widows are considered social outcasts and refrain from celebrating Holi. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Indian street vendor sells coloured powder, or 'gulal', on the eve of the Hindu festival of Holi in Siliguri on March 15, 2014. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colours, is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month and will be celebrated on March 16 this year. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Young Pakistani street vendors sell coloured powder or 'gulal' on the eve of the Hindu festival of Holi in Karachi on March 15, 2014. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colours, is observed in Pakistan at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month and will be celebrated on March 16 this year. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Indian sand artist Sudarsan Patnaik gives a final touch to a sand sculpture of the Hindu god Lord RadhaKrishna ahead of the forthcoming spring festival Holi in Bhubaneswar on March 15, 2014. Holi, the Hindu spring festival of colours, is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month and will be celebrated on March 17 this year. (AFP/Getty Images)