In pictures: How Boeing build its 777X aircraft

The 777X will be the largest and most efficient twin-engine jet in the world, with 12 percent lower fuel consumption and 10 percent lower operating costs than the competition.
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Workers operate a tape lay up machine, which applies carbon fiber tape to a wing panel, in the Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The aerospace giant is using many automated methods in the production of its newest airliner for precision required by new building materials. (Getty Images)
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A worker walks past a giant autoclave, which provides superheated pressure needed in the construction of the new 777X composite wing at the Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The 777X production line will feature several new automated methods needed for the precision required by newer building materials. (Getty Images)
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A worker operates an automated guided vehicle carrying a wing part through the Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The 777X production line will feature many new automated methods. (Getty Images)
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A Boeing 777 airliner sits on the production line on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. With the introduction of the 777X, Boeing will use several automated production methods. (Getty Images)
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Workers prepare a cell, which will ultrasonically test wing parts, at Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The aerospace giant is employing many automated methods in the production of the 777X airliner need for the precision required by newer building materials. (Getty Images)
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A wing panel mold used to produce composite wings for the Boeing 777X sits inside the Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. With the production of the 777X airliner, the aerospace giant will introduce several automated production methods needed for precision required by newer building materials. (Getty Images)
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Workers operate a tape lay up machine, which applies carbon fiber tape to a wing panel, in the Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The aerospace giant is using many automated methods in the production of its newest airliner for precision required by new building materials. (Getty Images)
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Workers operate an automated guided vehicle carrying a wing part through the Boeing 777X Composite Wing Center on June 12, 2017 in Everett, Washington. The 777X production line will feature many new automated methods. (Getty Images)
Tue 13 Jun 2017 01:25 PM