In pictures: Phone booths in Times Square tell oral histories of immigrant New Yorkers

Times Square Arts and Afghan-American artist Aman Mojadidi bring Once Upon a Place, an interactive public art installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices in New York City
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People stand in a repurposed telephone booth in Times Square and listen to the receiver as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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Jerome Farah and Kelly Missal stand in repurposed telephone booths in Times Square as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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Repurposed telephone booths stand in Times Square as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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Repurposed telephone booths stand in Times Square as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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People stand in a repurposed telephone booth in Times Square and listen to the receiver as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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Kelly Missal stands in a repurposed telephone booth in Times Square and listens to the receiver as part of artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)
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A man stands in a repurposed telephone booth in Times Square listening to artist Aman Mojadidi interactive public art installation Once Upon a Place on June 27, 2017 in New York City. The three old phone booths, once a common sight throughout the city, are part of an installation that creates a platform for immigrant voices. With a ringing telephone, visitors can pick up the receiver and listen to oral histories of immigration from the newest New Yorkers. The exhibit runs through September 5. (Getty Images)