Indonesian Eid motorcycle migration

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One family take a rest as people migrate for the annual Muslim festival Eid in Gilimanuk, Bali Island, Indonesia. Due to increasing fuel costs, people are taking the cheaper option of riding a motorcycle for the journey. According to authorities, the total number of casualties from last year's Eid migration was 789 deaths with 90% of those deaths involving a motorcycle. (Getty Images)
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A mother breastfeeds her baby on top of a motorcycle on road as people migrate for the annual Muslim festival Eid in Gilimanuk, Bali Island, Indonesia. It's the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and millions of Indonesians pack their children - and whatever else they can - onto their motorcycles and hit the road to spend the Eid al-Fitr holidays in their home villages. (Getty Images)
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Hundreds of motorcycles are seen on road on the way to Gilimanuk, Bali Island, Indonesia. Long journeys along dangerous roads in stifling heat and dust are no obstacle in a country where about 70 million people earn less than two dollars a day and the price of a bus or train ticket is just too much to bear. (Getty Images)
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Millions of people in the world's most populous Muslim country have taken advantage of cheap credit in recent years to buy motorcycles for the first time.\nTransport ministry figures show that the number of Indonesians driving motorcycles home for Eid has more than tripled over the past five years. (Getty Images)
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One family riding a motorcycle is seen queueing for ferry transfer as people migrate for the annual Muslim festival Eid in Gilimanuk, Bali Island, Indonesia. (Getty Images)
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Hundreds of people will never make it home. According to police figures, three-quarters of the 789 people killed in road accidents in Indonesia last Eid were riding motorcycles.\nNational police traffic director Yudi Sushariyanto said the scooter-style motorcycles favoured by Indonesian workers were not designed for long journeys and were no match for the buses and trucks on the nation's highways. (Getty Images)
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Indonesian transport officials recorded 2.1 million motorcycles leaving Jakarta and its surrounding areas last year and it is predicted that number will increase to 2.5 million this year. (Getty Images)
Mon 29 Sep 2008 01:07 PM