Mohamed Mursi in pictures

Arabian Business looks back at the political career of ousted Egyptian president
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Parliamentary elections took place in December 2011, with Morsi attending polling stations in Giza during the second stage of the elections. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Prior to being elected Egypt’s president, Mohamed Morsi was spokesman of the Muslim Brotherhood. Here he listens to senior brotherhood member Essam el-Erian during a 2010 press conference at which the party criticised Hosni Mubarak’s government and accused them of planning to rig the 2010 parliamentary elections. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Morsi, pictured right, sat with fellow Muslim Brotherhood representatives Essam el-Arian and Saad al-Katatni at a press conference following talks with Mubarak’s government in February 2011. Opponents of Mubarak's embattled regime dismissed as insufficient an offer to include them in political reform plans, and renewed their demands that he step down. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Morsi became president of the Islamist, Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), formed by the Muslim Brotherhood in the wake of the 2011 revolution which removed Mubarak in February 2011. Here he attends a meeting at party headquarters in Cairo in November 2011, just before the first free elections since the end of Mubarak’s rule. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Presidential elections soon followed, and swathes of Morsi supporters gathered at a campaign rally in Zagazig City in April 2012. (AFP/Getty Images)
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A run-off election between Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq, an ex-prime minister under the ousted regime of Hosni Mubarak, led to Morsi being elected as president in June 2012. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Morsi became the country's first elected leader since a popular uprising ousted president Hosni Mubarak, won 51.73 percent of the vote against Shafiq. (AFP/Getty Images)
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He was sworn in at the Constitutional Court in Cairo, on 30 June, 2012. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Morsi speaks to reporters alongside Saudi Crown Prince Salman bin Abdulaziz upon arrival in Jeddah in July, 2012. This was his first foreign visit after taking office. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Mosri met with US Secretary of State Hilary Clinton a few days later as he acquainted himself with world politics’ leading players. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Cracks had started appearing in the government’s rule as early as August 2012, with protests taking place against Morsi and the president attempts to consolidate his power. (AFP/Getty Images)
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In September 2012, Morsi joined more than 120 prime ministers, presidents and monarchs at the U.N. in New York for the annual meeting. The focus of the meeting was the ongoing fighting in Syria. (AFP/Getty Images)
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More protests took place in November after Morsi assumed sweeping powers, putting him on a collision course with the judiciary, and raising questions about the country’s democratic future, as well as earing him the moniker of ‘new pharaoh’. (AFP/Getty Images)
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More protests took place in November after Morsi assumed sweeping powers, putting him on a collision course with the judiciary, and raising questions about the country’s democratic future, as well as earing him the moniker of ‘new pharaoh’. (AFP/Getty Images)
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At the turn of the year, Morsi attended the Arab Economic, Social and Development Summit in Riyadh. Saudi Arabia, aimed at relaunching regional cooperation in the face of economic challenges which were at the root of the Arab Spring uprisings. (AFP/Getty Images)
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But the protests continued, as a disgruntled general public called for the fall of Morsi and his government. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Demonstrations and rallies intensified, leading to many injuries and several deaths. The following months would witness almost continual protests against the government. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Egyptians in Port Said broke government-imposed curfews in order to march against the government at the end of January, following attacks on police stations in the wake of death sentences being passed against 21 football supporters who were accused of violence at a match that killed 74 people. (AFP/Getty Images)
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As protests gather popular support, it appears inevitable that Morsi and his government will face public anger unless they make concessions. (AFP/Getty Images)
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The months of June and July see opposition demonstrators step up their efforts to have Morsi removed. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Finally, after several days of huge demonstrations, the army announced that Morsi has been ousted, with fresh elections to follow in the near future. Morsi himself was held by the army in the immediate aftermath of the coup. (AFP/Getty Images)