US museum shows T-Rex bones

The rare fossilized bones of a Tyrannosaurus Rex have been presented to officials and the media at Washington DCs Smithsonian Museum. The nearly-complete skeleton of the 65-million-year-old dinosaur, found by Kathy and Tom Wankel while hiking in Montana in 1988, will be the centerpiece of the museums new 31,000 sq ft fossil hall, which will open in 2019.
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L-R: Kirk Johnson, Sant director of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, poses with Montana ranchers Kathy and Tom Wankel, Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick, commanding general and chief of engineers of the US Army Corps of Engineers and the fossilized right femur of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex during a preview of the fossils at the museum on April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. In 1988 the Wankels discovered the fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex while hiking in a rugged section of a federal wildlife refuge in eastern Montana. 16 crates of the nearly-complete dinosaur fossil will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (AFP/Getty Images)
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A crate containing the fossilized jaw bone of The Nation's T. Rex (Tyrannosaurus Rex) presented to the museum by the US Army Corps of Engineers during ceremonies at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. The crate,is one of 16, containing the remains of The Nations T. Rex, that was discovered by a Montana rancher near Fort Peck Reservoir in 1988 which is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers. The Nations T. Rex is on loan to the Natural History Museum for 50 years. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Director Kirk Johnson (L) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick unveil the fossilized right femur of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex during a preview at the museum April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, The nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History Director Kirk Johnson and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick help unveil some of the fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex during a preview at the museum April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, The nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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Visitors and media get a look inside a crate containing the fossilized jaw bone of The Nation's T. Rex (Tyrannosaurus Rex) presented to the museum by the US Army Corps of Engineers during ceremonies at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. The crate, is one of 16, containing the remains of The Nations T. Rex, that was discovered by a Montana rancher near Fort Peck Reservoir in1988 which is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers. The Nations T. Rex is on loan to the Natural History Museum for 50 years. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History employees roll one of 16 crates holding the fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex throught the museum's rotunda after the contents were previewed April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, the nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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Invited guests and members of the news media move in to get a better view of some of the fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex after they were unveiled during a preview at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, The nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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Journalists and guests stretch with their phones to get better angles on some of the fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex after they were unveiled during a preview at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, the nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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The fossilized bones of a 65-million-year-old Tyrannosaurus Rex are encased in plaster and held in padded crates after arriving at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. Formerly known as the Wankel T. Rex, The nearly-complete dinosaur fossil was discovered in 1988 in eastern Montana and will be the centerpiece of the museum's new 31,000-square-foot fossil hall, which will open in 2019. (Getty Images)
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Kirk Johnson(2nd-L), Sant Director of the National Museum of Natural History and Lt. Gen. Thomas Bostick, commanding general and chief of engineers of the US Army Corps of Engineers look into a crate containing the fossilized bones of The Nation's T. Rex (Tyrannosaurus Rex) during transfer ceremonies at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural Histoy April 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. The crate, is one of 16, containing the remains of The Nations T. Rex, that was discovered by a Montana rancher near Fort Peck Reservoir in1988 which is owned by the Army Corps of Engineers. The Nations T. Rex is on loan to the Natural History Museum for 50 years. (AFP/Getty Images)