Saudi Arabia to build 11 new “world-class” stadia

Kingdom will build three more stadia than Qatar intends to construct for the 2022 World Cup

Saudi Arabia has announced plans to build 11 new stadia – three more than Qatar is constructing for the football World Cup.

King Abdullah on Saturday ordered the stadia be “world-class”, each with a capacity for 45,000 spectators.

It follows the King Abdullah Sports City, a multi-use stadium that opened in Jeddah on May 1.

The kingdom already has 23 stadiums, according to the Saudi Gazette. King Fahd International Stadium in Riyadh has one of the largest stadium roofs in the world and was a venue for the FIFA World Youth Championship in 1989, including the final.

The new ones would be built in different regions of the kingdom.

Earlier this year Qatar announced it would cut the number of stadia it would build to host the 2022 World Cup from 12 to eight, without detailing why.

It has said the stadia would be air-conditioned to help deal with summer temperatures that can reach 50 degrees Celsius, although FIFA is yet to decide whether to reschedule the tournament for winter.

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Posted by: Saudi Engineer

Now if they pull the World Cup out of Qatar, they can bring it here!
WORLD CUP 2022 in KSA!!!

Posted by: Ulevpri

For which reason? With the current country standards and with their constant ignorance of human rights, no one will ever give them a global tournament...

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