The modern-day thobe

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Hatem Alakeel. (ITP Images)

Hatem Alakeel. (ITP Images)

Known as the Dishdasha in Kuwait and the Kandura in the UAE, the thobe is a traditional garb commonly worn by GCC nationals.

The long, crisp shirt-like garment goes all the down to the ankles, is long sleeved and typically worn with a Guthra and Egal.

Its colours are muted, with white being the most common since this hue reflects the light and gives off an aura of luxury. Lately, however, it seems like tradition is catching up with fashion as we see a number of local designers experimenting with different style innovations.

Their growing client base indicates that there is a high demand for this new approach of mixing traditional and western aesthetics. Three internationally recognised and regionally acclaimed designers are especially making a powerful impact in this industry.

We take a closer look and provide a brief overview of their vision, brand and path to success. Click on the links below for more information.

1. The royal innovator: Yahya Couture by Yahya Al Bishri

2. The fusion pioneer: Lomar Thobe by Loai Nassem

3. The king of couture: Toby by Hatem Alakeel

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Please post responsibly. Commenter Rules

Posted by: Mahmood

that looks absolutely atrocious, who ever designed that monstrosity clearly didn't notice the power ranger-esque thoub (pictured in middle). These pathetic fads dont last beyond the week's end.

Posted by: tfg

We've had this slowly hyping up every few year and then it dies off. No one wants to look different and silly.

Leave it as it is. I have'nt seen western business suits having any major overhauls for over a century!

Posted by: jonjon

i agree with you, there are somethings that should be left alone. all these colours and patterns makes the thobe (the picture) look too feminine and silly. why do people think they need to mess around with our traditions?

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