The World's Lebanon island project completed

South African construction firm says it has finished work on Royal Island Beach Club project
The Royal Island Beach Club on Lebanon Island in Dubais The World.
By Andy Sambidge
Sat 16 Feb 2013 03:05 PM

A South African construction firm has announced that it has finished work on the only commercially developed island on Dubai's The World.

The Cape Reed Group of Companies, which specialises in timber and thatch structures, said it has completed work on the Royal Island Beach Club, a Caribbean-style beach club on Lebanon Island.

The project, aimed at high-income clients, is the first commercial development to open on Dubai's famous offshore island project, Cape Reed said in a statement.

Cape Reed's work included the construction of the main restaurant building which seats up to 200 guests, as well as eight chalets, 10 beach umbrellas, and two cabanas for welcoming guests.

Special pressure-treated timber columns from South Africa were used to build all the structures, while the group's unique cape reed thatching was used for all the roofs, it added.

"The treatment of the timber had to be environmentally friendly as we did not want any chemicals in the timber treatment to endanger sea life surrounding the island," said Andre van Heerden, managing partner for Cape Reed's Middle East operations.

"The entire process from design to completion took more than a year due to the lengthy approval process by the developers because of the uniqueness of the project," added van Heerden.

Wakil Admed Azmi, owner of The Royal Island Beach Club which opened last year, said: "Their fine work is not only appreciated by us, but also by everyone who has visited this island, and we are all extremely satisfied by Cape Reed's work, as well as their professionalism and dedication."

The Royal Island Beach Club is located four kilometres out to sea, and takes approximately 30 minutes by water taxi.

The club has eight private chalets, an international cuisine restaurant, a swimming pool and two beach areas.

Construction on the offshore The World project ground to a near standstill in the wake of the financial crash, which saw real estate prices in Dubai fall more than 60 percent from their peak.

Almost all buyers on The World project have failed to begin work, with exceptions including work carried out by Kleindienst Group, the firm behind the six-island Heart of Europe project and the Lebanon island.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Subscribe to Arabian Business' newsletter to receive the latest breaking news and business stories in Dubai,the UAE and the GCC straight to your inbox.