US "deeply concerned" after Bahrain orders State Dpt official to leave

US Asst Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour accused of interfering in the Gulf state's internal affairs.

Tom Malinowski, US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour. (Getty Images)

Tom Malinowski, US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour. (Getty Images)

Bahrain on Monday ordered a visiting senior US official to leave the kingdom immediately because he had "intervened flagrantly" in the country's internal affairs, the state news agency BNA said.

BNA said the foreign ministry had declared US Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights and Labour, Tom Malinowski, persona non grata after he "held meetings with a particular party to the detriment of other interlocutors, thus discriminating between one people, contravening diplomatic norms and flouting normal interstate relations".

The latest move highlights the sensitivity in relations between the strategic allies. Bahrain is a US ally in a volatile region and has long provided a base for the US Navy's Fifth Fleet. But at the same it faces criticism over its record on human rights.

US State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said the United States was "deeply concerned" about Bahrain's demand that Malinowski leave immediately.

In a statement, Psaki said the visit had been coordinated with Bahrain in advance and said the government was "well aware" that visiting US officials typically meet with different political groups.

Psaki also said that Bahrain had imposed requirements on Malinowski's visit that violated diplomatic protocol.

"The government insisted - without advance warning and after his visit had already commenced - to have a Foreign Ministry representative present at all of Assistant Secretary Malinowski's private meetings with individuals and groups representing a broad spectrum of Bahraini society, including those held at the US embassy," she said.

It is not the first time that US actions in Bahrain have created political controversy. Last year, Bahraini lawmakers urged the government to stop the US ambassador in Bahrain from interfering in domestic affairs and meeting government opponents.

Bahrain, which is ruled by the Sunni al-Khalifa family, still faces frequent low-level unrest more than three years after authorities quelled Shi'ite Muslim-led protests against the Sunni-led government.

A Bahraini policeman died on Saturday of wounds sustained in a bombing that the Interior Ministry said was a terrorist act.

Bahraini Shi'ites, who make up the majority of the population, complain of political and economic marginalisation, an accusation the government denies.

Under criticism from human rights groups, the government invited an independent inquiry to examine its handling of the trouble in 2011. Its report said the authorities had used widespread and excessive force, including torture to extract confessions.

The Bahraini government says it has taken steps to address the problems by dismissing those responsible and introducing cameras at police stations.

Join the Discussion

Disclaimer:The view expressed here by our readers are not necessarily shared by Arabian Business, its employees, sponsors or its advertisers.

Please post responsibly. Commenter Rules

Posted by: Mohammed Yousuf

I think Government of Bahrain is now taking right decision if they have done it bore than things would have not become worst in the past. These trouble makers should be kicked out immediately than only Bahrain can have peace.

Posted by: procan

Pull the 5th Fleet out now.

Posted by: jac

This Malinowski was only recently appointed and worked at Human Rights Watch before - an organization that does not even pretend to be balanced with regards to Bahrain. This was a deliberately provocative appointment by the State Department and Bahrain has reacted as is its right.

All comments are subject to approval before appearing

Further reading

Features & Analysis
Banking on reforms in Kuwait

Banking on reforms in Kuwait

As Kuwait stares down its first deficit in 20 years, the Gulf...

Saudis face dilemma between size and pricing in debut bond sale

Saudis face dilemma between size and pricing in debut bond sale

Riyadh is under pressure to maximise the size of its international...

How technology is changing the UAE

How technology is changing the UAE

Free wifi in public spaces and remotely monitoring utility use...

Most Discussed