Work on Dubai's Great Britain island to start by 2014

Owner Safi Qurashi in talks with Nakheel to develop infrastructure on The World project
British real estate developer Safi Qurashi s in talks with master developer Nakheel to develop infrastructure on the manmade island.
By Shane McGinley
Thu 22 Nov 2012 10:53 AM

UK real estate developer Safi Qurashi, owner of the Great Britain-shaped island off the coast of Dubai, is in talks with Nakheel to develop infrastructure on the manmade island with an aim to start construction within two years, he told Arabian Business.

Qurashi, who famously paid US$60m for the island on Nakheel’s ‘The World’ artificial islands development, was earlier this year released on bail and cleared of two counts of cheque fraud, having served two-and-a-half years of a seven-year jail sentence.

"We had a plan when we bought [Great Britain] - and it hasn't changed," Qurashi said. "The issue that we have is obviously infrastructure - when we bought it we were promised infrastructure and that hasn't happened. But we've been speaking to Nakheel and they've kind of given us the green light to come up with our own infrastructure. At some point next year, we should be able to announce what we will do with it."

Qurashi added he is in talks with other island owners and there is still strong opinion that The World has potential, but infrastructure is the main challenge.

While some buyers have walked away from the project, he said he was committed, but that it will take "at least a couple of years" - or to at least 2014 - until building work is likely to start on Great Britain.

Earlier this year, Qurashi was cleared of two counts of cheque fraud after the courts heard that he had written them as security and that they should have been returned to him rather than cashed.

In April, Austrian developer Kleindienst Group, one of The World’s largest owners, claimed during the first hearing of a US$199m legal battle that the master developer behind the project did not receive regulatory approval to construct the manmade islands and has been unable to complete the project because it is insolvent.

Kleindienst Group was sued by ‘The World’, a subsidiary of Dubai government-owned Nakheel, for breach of contract in an action lodged on June 12, a legal battle that has stopped work on the Kleindienst’s US$840m resort.

In the first hearing of the case at the Dubai World Tribunal, Kleindienst’s legal representative from Davidson & Co, Mohammed Zaman QC, claimed Kleindienst deemed the contract terminated and argued that the ‘The World’ master developer was insolvent as it was unable to meet its debt obligations and was seeking to consolidate payments with owners who had defaulted.

Graham Lovett, regional managing partner at Dubai legal firm Clifford Chance, and legal representative for ‘The World’, refuted the allegations and claimed the company was not insolvent and was still active.

In terms of 'The World's' infrastructure hubs, which the defence claimed the master developer had failed to deliver, Lovett said the ‘The World’ was only contractually obliged to construct the manmade islands and the infrastructure works were not part of the developer's responsibility.

The defence further claimed the Nakheel subsidiary had not obtained formal written permission from the Real Estate Regulatory Authority (RERA) to start construction of the islands and the sales had not been registered with the Dubai Land Department, dismissing the legitimacy of the sales and purchase agreements.

Lovett dismissed the allegation and said any claim 'The World' developer did not have approval to develop the offshore man-made islands was ‘absurd’.

Kleindienst’s legal team also claimed the development was stalled or “in a coma” and the lack of development on the 300 islands meant RERA had refused it permission to continue selling off-plan properties in February 2009 because construction was behind schedule.

In a bid to determine the level of activity on the project, tribunal judge Sir Anthony Evans ordered ‘The World’ to produce a series of documents within 56 days. It was instructed to declare how many of the 300 islands had been sold, how many of the sales and purchase contracts were still active, how many buyers were in dispute with the developer over payment and how many owners had defaulted.

It was further ordered to declare how staffing levels had changed over the last number of years and what infrastructure contracts had been awarded to subcontractors.

Construction on the project ground to a near standstill in the wake of the financial crash, which saw real estate prices in Dubai fall more than 60 percent from their peak.

While Qurashi is looking to push ahead with work on Great Britain, almost all buyers on the project have failed to begin work, with exception of the Lebanon island which opened earlier this year.

A spat between Nakheel and Penguin Marine, the company contracted to ferry goods to the islands, has also affected island owners seeking to fast-track construction on their sites.

Nakheel has said 70 percent of the 300 manmade islands are sold and that building work is the responsibility of the owners.

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