Bahrain's June temperature soars to 100-year high

Bahrain had 20 days in June where maximum temperature exceeded 40 degrees C
Bahrain's June temperature soars to 100-year high
According to Bahrain Meteorological Directorate (BMD), the mean temperature for June was 36.3°C, which is 3.9°C above the long-term normal for the month and the highest since 1902. The previous record was 35.7°C in June 2018.
By Gavin Gibbon
Tue 09 Jul 2019 10:43 AM

Bahrain baked in June with the hottest temperatures ever experienced in the kingdom for the month since 1902.

According to Bahrain Meteorological Directorate (BMD), the mean temperature for June was 36.3°C, which is 3.9°C above the long-term normal for the month and the highest since 1902. The previous record was 35.7°C in June 2018.

The mean maximum temperature of the month was 40.9°C, 4.5°C above the long-term normal and the highest mean maximum temperatures for the month of June since 1946. The old record was 40.2°C in June 1999.

During the month, Bahrain had 20 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40°C, the highest number where the maximum temperature exceeded 40°C for June since 1946.

While the highest temperature recorded during the month was 45.3°C on the June 30 at Bahrain International Airport - the seventh highest maximum temperature for June since 1946 at the airport.

The highest temperature recorded in the month at Bahrain International Circuit was 48.3°C on June 28 and 29 and at Durrat Al Bahrain was 47.5°C on June 28.

It comes as United Nations experts warn that the increased temperatures could cost the global economy as much as $2.4 trillion this year in lost productivity.

The lowest temperature recorded, meanwhile, was 29.7°C, set on June 4 at Bahrain International Airport, but recorded 26.9°C on June 23 at Durrat Al Bahrain.

In terms of humidity, the mean relative humidity for June was 41 percent, whereas the mean maximum relative humidity was 64 percent and the mean minimum 22 percent.

June 2019 was the second sunniest June since the sunshine records began in 1968 whereby there were 371.1 hours of sunshine recorded. This is only exceeded by June 2017, when there was a record 371.4 hours.

Kuwait last month reportedly recorded the highest temperatures in the world, surging to 63 degrees Celsius under direct sunlight. Local Arabic newspaper Al Rai also reported that a worker had died of heatstroke and overexposure to the sun.

With temperatures soaring around the globe, increases in heat stroke will have an impact on global productivity and economic losses, notably in agriculture and construction, UN labour experts said, according to a report by the WAM state news agency.

The International Labour Organisation (ILO) said the poorest countries, particularly in West Africa and South-East Asia, would be hit hardest.

The ILO put the global cost this year to the economy from a loss of productivity at around $2.4 trillion, each year, based on a global temperature rise of only 1.5°C by the end of this century.

“The impact of heat stress on labour productivity is a serious consequence of climate change,” Catherine Saget, Chief of Unit in the ILO’s Research department, was quoted as saying.

The ILO report said high risk of heat stroke was possible in temperatures above 35°C and in locations where there is high humidity.

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