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Sun 21 Nov 2010 11:22 PM

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Emirates' Clark defends proposal for extra capacity in Canada

Airline's increased presence to deliver favourable benefits to Canadian economy, its president says

Emirates' Clark defends proposal for extra capacity in Canada
AIRLINE BOSS: Emirates airline president, Tim Clark (ITP Images)
Emirates' Clark defends proposal for extra capacity in Canada
The airline in a statement said they have listened to the concerns of Air Canada with regard to market access

Emirates, the world’s biggest airline by international traffic, is not seeking to “swamp” Canada with large amounts of capacity.

“Emirates has listened to the concerns of Air Canada with regard to market access and we can assure the Canadian government that the increased presence of Emirates in Canada will only deliver favourable benefits to the Canadian economy and in particular to the travelling public,” the airline’s president Tim Clark said in a statement.

Responding to comments made in the Canadian parliament, Clark said Emirates “is not subsidised in any way, shape or form by the Dubai government.”

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J Smith 9 years ago

This has nothing to do with hurting Canada and everything to do with protecting Lufthansa's transit traffic. The German Government has been lobbying Canada very hard on this issue.

Muhammad Rehan 9 years ago

You are right Smith, what I also observed during my 8 years stay in Canada, those ministers sitting in their offices never take decision in timely manner, even if the matter is of critical or strategic nature. As a result, consequences always seems not favorable, specifically for Canadian economy and for positive future business prospects.