Font Size

- Aa +

Mon 12 Oct 2009 04:00 AM

Font Size

- Aa +

How much is too much?

Logistics managers in the Middle East are notoriously busy people. With workloads constantly increasing, the daily routine has undoubtedly become a challenge. However, in the name of personal development, let's hope the supply chain community will find time to attend a wealth of forthcoming seminars, conferences and exhibitions for the industry.

Logistics managers in the Middle East are notoriously busy people. With workloads constantly increasing, the daily routine has undoubtedly become a challenge. However, in the name of personal development, let's hope the supply chain community will find time to attend a wealth of forthcoming seminars, conferences and exhibitions for the industry.

Following a summer lull, the choices will considerably increase in the next couple of months, as a staggering number of logistics events are taking place across the region. The list of conferences and seminars almost seems never ending; SITL Dubai 2009 has arguably emerged as the most-awaiting (readers can find a detailed preview in this issue of the magazine), although smaller-scale forums by the Dubai-based trade associations SCLG and CILT, as well as the International Supply Chain Education Alliance (ISCEA), will probably find a loyal audience too.

Even further afield, Oman will host the Joint Military Logistics seminar at the beginning of the month, followed by its much-awaited Transoman exhibition, while Bahrain is welcoming guests for the Gulf Petrochemical & Chemical Association (GPCA) Supply Chain Forum.

On a positive note, the situation is a great reflection on the region's logistics success, which is something we should celebrate. The focus of industry events is also shifting. Instead of generic themes, organisers are becoming more specific. While SITL Dubai is targeting high-level executives from both regional and international logistics companies, for instance, the Joint Military Logistics and GPCA forums are aimed at the defence and chemical sectors respectively.

Of course, certain sections of the logistics community have expressed concerns about a potential overload of events, which is completely understandable. To avoid such a situation, it is probably wise to spread the events more evenly throughout the year. Understandably, arranging the dates for conferences is somewhat difficult in the Middle East.

The challenge is avoiding national or religious holidays, such as Ramadan, and attempting to second-guess rival events to avoid a potential clash. The current situation is now unavoidable, but hopefully organisers can prevent a similar clash in the future. In the meantime, if you are attending any of these events, why not take the opportunity to meet the Logistics Middle East team and pass your opinions on the magazine!

If you have any comments to make on this month's issue, please email Robeel Haq, senior group editor (robeel.haq@itp.com)

For all the latest transport news from the UAE and Gulf countries, follow us on Twitter and Linkedin, like us on Facebook and subscribe to our YouTube page, which is updated daily.