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Mon 6 Oct 2014 01:50 PM

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Iran releases UAE journalist, American husband still in jail

Yeganeh Salehi, Tehran correspondent for The National is in good health after being freed, says relative

Iran releases UAE journalist, American husband still in jail
The National reporter Yeganeh Salehi, with her husband Jason Rezaian, a Tehran correspondent for the Washington Post. (Image from International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran).

Iran has released an Iranian journalist on bail after more than two months held without charge, but her husband, a dual nationality Iranian-American who reports for the Washington Post, remains in jail, her family said on Monday.

Yeganeh Salehi, Tehran correspondent for the United Arab Emirates English language newspaper, The National, was freed last week.

"She is in good health," one relative, who asked not to be named, told Reuters by telephone from Tehran. The relatives did not provide anymore details.

Salehi and her husband Jason Rezaian were picked up from their home in Tehran on July 22 and detained.

Two other journalists, an Iranian-American photojournalist and her husband, were also detained on the same day, but later released. Their names have not been disclosed.

Rezaian, 38, has been based in Iran since 2008. The United States, which has no diplomatic ties with Iran, has called for his release.

Iran does not recognise dual nationality and President Hassan Rouhani declined to provide details on Rezaian's case when questioned by reporters during his trip to the United Nations in New York in September.

"If they have not committed any crimes, it will be determined that he or she is innocent, they will be freed and it will be announced openly," Rouhani told CNN.

The New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists says Iran has around 35 imprisoned journalists and is in the top three countries for jailing reporters.

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