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Thu 9 Jul 2015 11:46 AM

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Moroccan PM's appeal against 'scantily' clad J-Lo rejected by regulator

The Prime Minister had called for sanctions against the public TV channel that broadcast images of Jennifer Lopez in “suggestive poses” during a concert in the country

Moroccan PM's appeal against 'scantily' clad J-Lo rejected by regulator
Jennifer Lopez (Getty Images)

A Moroccan regulator has rejected a request by the Prime Minister to sanction a television channel for broadcasting scenes of a “scantily dressed” Jennifer Lopez during a concert in the country, AFP has reported.

Prime Minister Abdelilah Benkirane (pictured below) demanded the public broadcaster 2M be punished after the US pop star’s performance at the annual Mawazine music festival in May sparked controversy.

She was reportedly criticised for her “suggestive poses” and for being “scantily” dressed.

Government spokesman Mustapha Khalfi, a member of the ruling Justice and Development party, denounced the broadcast as “unacceptable and goes against broadcasting law”.

Benkirane wrote to the High Audiovisual Communication Authority (CSCA) urging it to sanction the channel’s management, saying the performance had “sexual connotations” and provoked the “religious and moral values of the country”, according to a notice posted on the CSCA website.

The authority rejected the request on the grounds it was not within its legal remit.

However, it said it would “study this issue” bearing in mind the principles of “independence, freedom and responsibility of operators in the performance of audiovisual communication” as well as the Constitution.

 

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