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Thu 7 Jan 2016 12:36 PM

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'Je suis Charlie' – One year after

France is marking the first anniversary of the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on 7 January 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris.

'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Honore one of the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Charb one of the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 in Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Wolinski one of the victims killed in the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A picture taken on January 5, 2016 on Paris shows an art piece made of a painting by French cartoonist Philippe Honore (known as Honore) and mosaic picturing French cartoonist Cabu one of the victims killed on the attack of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo on January 7, 2015. A total of 17 people were killed in the three days of attacks dubbed 'France's 9/11', marking the start of a string of jihadist strikes in the country that culminated in November's massacre in Paris. (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A woman looks at the special commemorative edition of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo at a newsstand in Paris, on January 6, 2015, to mark the one-year anniversary of the jihadist attack that claimed the lives of 12 people, including three of its best-known cartoonists. True to form, the cover is unabashedly provocative, featuring a Kalashnikov-toting God figure wearing a blood-stained white robe, under the headline: 'One year on: The killer is still at large.' (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
A woman looks at the special commemorative edition of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo at a newsstand in Paris, on January 6, 2015, to mark the one-year anniversary of the jihadist attack that claimed the lives of 12 people, including three of its best-known cartoonists. True to form, the cover is unabashedly provocative, featuring a Kalashnikov-toting God figure wearing a blood-stained white robe, under the headline: 'One year on: The killer is still at large.' (AFP/Getty Images)
'Je suis Charlie' – One year after
French soldiers patrol outside the Hyper Cacher, a kosher supermarket, near Paris, on January 5, 2016, after France's President attended a commemorative ceremony to pay tribute to the victims of the terrorist attack on the supermarket on January 9, 2015. French President Francois Hollande today kicked off a week of commemorations marking the jihadist rampage in Paris that began with an assault on satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo and lasted three days, claiming 17 lives. The president and mayor unveiled a plaque at the Hyper Cacher, in an eastern suburb where four Jews -- three shoppers and an employee -- were killed during a horrifying hostage drama. (AFP/Getty Images)