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Tue 22 Jul 2014 12:46 PM

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A business profits from California drought

As the severe California drought continues to worsen, a grass painting company profits since home owners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green.

A business profits from California drought
Green Canary president Shawn Sahbari sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, home owners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
Green Canary president Shawn Sahbari sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, homeowners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
Green Canary worker Samuel Bucio sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, home owners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
Green Canary president Shawn Sahbari sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, home owners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
Green Canary president Shawn Sahbari (L) sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, home owners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
Green Canary president Shawn Sahbari sprays green water-based paint on a partially dead lawn at the Almaden Valley Athletic Club on July 21, 2014 in San Jose, California. As the severe California drought continues to worsen, homeowners and businesses looking to conserve water are letting lawns die off and are having them painted to look green. The paint lasts up to 90 days on dormant lawns and will not wash off. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
California Gov. Jerry Brown holds a chart showing statewide average precipitation as he speaks during a news conference on January 17, 2014 in San Francisco, California. Gov. Brown declared a drought state of emergency for California as the state faces water shortfalls in what is expected to be the driest year in state history. Residents are being asked to voluntarily reduce water usage by 20%. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
A sign on a farm trailer reading 'Food grows where water flows,' hangs over dry, cracked mud at the edge of a farm April 16, 2009 near Buttonwillow, California. Central Valley farmers and farm workers are suffering through the third year of the worsening California drought with extreme water shortages and job losses. The office of California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger predicts Central Valley farm losses of $325 million to $477 million and total losses for crop production and related business to be between $440 and $644 million. Central Valley is expected to lose 16,200 to 23,700 full-time jobs and food prices are expected to rise nationwide. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
A truck carrying farm tractors passes a sign near state highway 99 that calls for water and drought management actions on February 6, 2014 north of Bakersfield, California. Now in its third straight year of unprecedented drought, California is experiencing its driest year on record, dating back 119 years and possible the worst in the past 500 years. Grasslands that support cattle have dried up, forcing ranchers to feed them expensive supplemental hay to keep them from starving or to sell at least some of their herds, and farmers are struggling with diminishing crop water and what to plant or whether to tear out permanent crops which use water year-round such, as almond trees. About 17 rural communities could run out of drinking water within several weeks and politicians are pushing to undo laws that protect several endangered species. (Getty Images)
A business profits from California drought
A sign is posted near an almond farm on February 25, 2014 in Turlock, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)