We noticed you're blocking ads.

Keep supporting great journalism by turning off your ad blocker.

Questions about why you are seeing this? Contact us

Font Size

- Aa +

Mon 16 Mar 2015 12:00 PM

Font Size

- Aa +

A look back at 30 years of “dot com”

On March 15, 1985, a computer manufacturer called Symbolics registered Symbolics.com. It was a time when it quite literally had the choice of any word or name on the planet to procure for its domain.

A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
A picture taken on March 15, 2013 in Paris shows the screen of a computer connected on the internet and displaying a webpage. (AFP/Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
Sir Tim Berners-Lee (R) inventor of the World Wide Web addresses officials in Guildhall as he is awarded the Honorary Freedom of the City of London on September 24, 2014 in London, England. During the ceremony involving the 125 elected Members of the City of London Corporation, Sir Tim will be invited to join the ranks of leading world figures and statesmen, such as Lord Nelson, Winston Churchill, Florence Nightingale, Princess Diana, Nelson Mandela, and most recently, Archbishop Desmond Tutu. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
Queen Elizabeth II shakes hands with Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World wide web, as she re-launches the Monarchy website (www.royal.gov.uk) at Buckingham Palace on February 12, 2009 in London, England. The internet site has been overhauled, providing simpler menus, more video material and historic documents. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
UN Secretary General Kofi Annan (L) and British scientist Tim Berners-Lee explain to opening of a message sending programe to schoolchildren from a server, at the CERN stand during the UN-sponsored World Summit on the Information Society, 10 December 2003 at the Geneva Palexpo. Delegates from some 175 countries, including about 40 heads of state, are attending the world's first information summit, marking the climax of months of wrangling by governments over key issues such as how to close the technology gap between the north and south and who should rule the Internet. (AFP/Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
A free Wi-Fi hotspot beams broadband internet from atop a public phone booth on July 11, 2012 in Manhattan, New York City. New York City launched a pilot program Wednesday to provide free public Wi-Fi at public phone booths around the five boroughs. The first ten booths were lit up with Wi-Fi routers attached to the top of existing phone booths, with six booths in Manhattan, two in Brooklyn, and one in Queens. Additional locations, including ones in the Bronx and Staten Island, are to be added soon. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
Steve Jobs, Chief Executive Officer of Apple computers, stands by a projection of the iTunes website as he launches iTunes Music Store in the territories of Great Britain, Germany and France, on June 15, 2004 in London. The iTunes store allows users to buy and download albums or individual songs from a library of 700,000 songs. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
This photo taken December 14, 2010 shows a map on a page from the Facebook social network site. A Facebook intern interested in seeing how political borders affect friendships around the globe has created a map of the world by sampling data from the social network's 500 million user base. The map displays friendships as lights on a deep blue background. The eastern half of the United States and Europe shine the brightest, while China, Russia and central Africa, where Facebook has little presence, are mainly dark.'I was interested in seeing how geography and political borders affected where people lived relative to their friends,' said Paul Butler, an intern on Facebook's data infrastructure engineering team. (AFP/Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
A trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) works as Twitter's initial price offering (IPO) is finalized on November 7, 2013 in New York City. Twitter went public November 7, on the NYSE selling at a market price of $45.10, with the initial price being set at $26 on November 6. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
Host Samuel L. Jackson performs onstage during the 2009 ESPY Awards held at Nokia Theatre LA Live on July 15, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. The 17th annual ESPYs will air on Sunday, July 19 at 9PM ET on ESPN. (Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
A visitor of the 'NEXT Berlin' conference tries out the Google Glass on April 24, 2013 in Berlin. 'NEXT Berlin' describes itself as 'a meeting place for the European digital industry'. Organisers say that at the conference, 'marketing decision-makers and business developers meet technical experts and creative minds to discuss what will be important in the next 12 months'. The conference is running from April 23 to 24, 2013. (AFP/Getty Images)
A look back at 30 years of “dot com”
A poster placed on a lamp post calls for the return of the internet after it was shut down by the government on February 1, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Protests in Egypt continued with the largest gathering yet, with many tens of thousands assembling in central Cairo, demanding the ouster of Egyptian President Hosni Mabarak. The Egyptian army has said it will not fire on protestors as they gather in large numbers in central Cairo. (Getty Images)