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Wed 18 Jun 2014 12:37 PM

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A slow farewell to the phone booth

The widespread-use of personal mobile phones has made the phone booth a relic of the past.

A slow farewell to the phone booth
Hundreds of disused phone booths once operated by Deutsche Telekom stand at a Deutsche Telekom storage site on June 17, 2014 in Michendorf, Germany. The widespread-use of personal mobile phones has made the phone booth a relic of the past, and Deutsche Telekom has removed them across Germany. (Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
Hundreds of disused phone booths once operated by Deutsche Telekom stand at a Deutsche Telekom storage site on June 17, 2014 in Michendorf, Germany. The widespread-use of personal mobile phones has made the phone booth a relic of the past, and Deutsche Telekom has removed them across Germany. (Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
Hundreds of disused phone booths once operated by Deutsche Telekom stand at a Deutsche Telekom storage site on June 17, 2014 in Michendorf, Germany. The widespread-use of personal mobile phones has made the phone booth a relic of the past, and Deutsche Telekom has removed them across Germany. (Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
Hundreds of disused phone booths once operated by Deutsche Telekom stand at a Deutsche Telekom storage site on June 17, 2014 in Michendorf, Germany. The widespread-use of personal mobile phones has made the phone booth a relic of the past, and Deutsche Telekom has removed them across Germany. (Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
A public phone booth is viewed on a Manhattan street on May 2, 2014 in New York City. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has called for proposals to turn underused phone booths into Wi-Fi hot spots. If successful the program would create one of the largest free public wi-fi networks in the country. (Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
Aerial view taken on May 1, 2014 shows discarded phone boxes of German telecommunications giant Deutsche Telekom in Michendorf near Berlin, eastern Germany. Around 3,000 boxes - the classical ones in yellow, the more recent ones in magenta - are stocked at the depot and are sold for a price between 300 and 400 euros each. (AFP/Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
A picture taken on January 17, 2013, shows a phone booth in La Batisse, near Castera-Verduzan, southwestern France. Phone booths are due to partially disappear in France, because of lack of profitability and in most cases, lack of utility. French operator Orange - formerly France Telecom - owner of the booths, plans to gradually withdraw them, leaving at least one functioning booth in towns over 1000 inhabitants. (AFP/Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
A truck removes a phone booth on February 18, 2014 in Bethune, northern France. French telecom operator Orange is gradually removing phone booths as the increasing use of mobile phones has led to a decreased in the use of the booths in France. (AFP/Getty Images)
A slow farewell to the phone booth
A mini library made from a former phone booth is seen in IKEM hospital on January 9, 2014 in Prague.Two young Czechs have found a new life for phone booths scrapped amid a surge in mobile telephony, converting them into mini-libraries with the first installed at a Prague hospital. Monika Serbusova, a 27-year-old creative specialist and the co-author of the project, said she and her friend had drawn inspiration from a similar project in Britain. (AFP/Getty Images)