Daily life in Iraq

The famous al-Mutanabi street in central Baghdad, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world and a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital.
GettyImages-483279202.jpg
1 of 6
An Iraqi man looks at a book of late Syrian poet Nizar Qabbani displayed outside a bookshop on al-Mutanabi Street in central Baghdad on August 7, 2015. The famous street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)
GettyImages-483272790.jpg
2 of 6
Iraqis look at books displayed outside bookshops on al-Mutanabi Street in central Baghdad on August 7, 2015. The famous street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)
GettyImages-483272792.jpg
3 of 6
Iraqis look at books displayed outside bookshops on al-Mutanabi Street in central Baghdad on August 7, 2015. The famous street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)
GettyImages-483272776.jpg
4 of 6
Iraqis walk past a statue of the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi on August 7, 2015, in central Baghdad. The al-Mutanabi street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the poet al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)
GettyImages-483272772.jpg
5 of 6
Iraqis look at books displayed outside bookshops on al-Mutanabi street in central Baghdad on August 7, 2015. The famous street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)
GettyImages-483272760.jpg
6 of 6
An Iraqi artist sketches a portrait on al-Mutanabi street in central Baghdad on August 7, 2015. The famous street, which was inaugurated in 1932 by King Faisal I and named after the leading 10th-century poet Abu al-Tayyib al-Mutanabi who born in what is now Iraq, is regarded by Iraqis as an intellectual hub of the Arab world, becoming over the decades a meeting place for writers, artists and intellectuals from across the capital. (AFP/Getty Images)