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Wed 26 Feb 2014 12:57 PM

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Drought cripples Californian farms

A prolonged drought has threatened the existence of large numbers of farms in California. Farmers have struggled to water their corps, and the US Bureau of Reclamation has announced it will not provide Central Valley farmers with water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain run-off.

Drought cripples Californian farms
A tractor plows a field on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. Almond farmer Barry Baker of Baker Farming had 1,000 acres, 20 percent, of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered as the California drought continues. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
A tractor plows a field on February 25, 2014 in Tracy, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
A sign is posted near an almond farm on February 25, 2014 in Turlock, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Sheep graze near a dried irrigation channel on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Water drips from a pipe into an irrigation channel on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Rotting pomegranates hang from a tree in an orchard on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Drip irrigation waters a field of grape vines on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Almond trees bloom at Baker Farming on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. Almond farmer Barry Baker of Baker Farming had 1,000 acres, 20 percent, of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered as the California drought continues. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
A tractor moves an uprooted almond tree into a shredder at Baker Farming on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. Almond farmer Barry Baker of Baker Farming had 1,000 acres, 20 percent, of his almond trees removed because he doesn't have access to enough water to keep them watered as the California drought continues. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
A sign about the need for water in California's Central Valley is posted on the side of a trailer on February 25, 2014 in Firebaugh, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
A sign is posted at an almond orchard on February 25, 2014 in Los Banos, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)
Drought cripples Californian farms
Sheep graze on dry grass on February 25, 2014 in Los Banos, California. As the California drought continues and farmers struggle to water their crops, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials announced this past Friday that they will not be providing Central Valley farmers with any water from the federally run system of reservoirs and canals fed by mountain runoff. (Getty Images)