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Tue 22 Mar 2016 12:59 PM

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End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?

Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months.

End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
A workers uses a front-loader to move piles of garbage from Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Workers use a front-loader to move piles of garbage from Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Trucks are seen next to piles of garbage in Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, ahead of moving it to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Trucks are seen next to piles of garbage in Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, ahead of moving it to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Workers use a front-loader to move piles of garbage from Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Workers use a front-loader to move piles of garbage from Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Workers use a front-loader to move piles of garbage from Jdeideh, a Beirut suburb, to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
Workers use a front-loader to move piles of garbage from a Beirut suburb to the country's largest landfill of Naameh, just south of the Lebanese capital, on March 20, 2016. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (ANWAR AMRO/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
A general view shot taken on March 21, 2016, shows trucks dumping their load at the Naameh landfill, just south of the Lebanese capital, Beirut. Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)
End in sight for Lebanon's environment trash crisis?
A general view shot taken on March 21, 2016, shows the Naameh landfill, just south of the Lebanese capital, Beirut (background). Trucks began moving stacked rubbish outside the Lebanese capital under a plan adopted by the Lebanese government to put an end to the waste crisis that has been going on for eight months, according to an AFP photographer. Lebanon said on March 12 it would temporarily reopen a landfill to ease the crisis as thousands of people demonstrated in Beirut against the waste pile-up. Rubbish has piled up on beaches, in mountain forests and river beds across Lebanon since the closure in July of the country's largest landfill at Naameh. (PATRICK BAZ/AFP/Getty Images)