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Tue 26 May 2015 01:03 PM

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Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress

Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence.

Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah is surrounded by journalists after she received a suspended jail sentence and was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah (C) is surrounded by journalists after she received a suspended jail sentence and was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah (C) is surrounded by journalists after she received a suspended jail sentence and was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah (C) leaves after she received a suspended jail sentence and was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Former Korean Air (KAL) executive Cho Hyun-Ah (centre R, in black) reacts as she is surrounded by journalists after receiving a suspended jail sentence and was freed by a Seoul appeals court in Seoul on May 22, 2015, after she had been jailed for a year in February for disrupting a flight in a rage over macadamia nuts. The High Court in Seoul ruled that the behaviour of Cho Hyun-Ah, the eldest daughter of the airline's chairman, had not resulted in a change of flight path -- the most serious charge against her -- and handed down a reduced suspended sentence. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Korean Air CEO Cho Yang-Ho (C) arrives for the trial of his daughter Hyun-Ah at a court in Seoul on January 30, 2015. Cho apologised for his daughter's behaviour to a South Korean court, where she is on trial for air safety violations after a now notorious 'nut rage' incident. (AFP/Getty Images)
Freedom for 'Nut rage' Korean Air heiress
Korean Air CEO Cho Yang-Ho (3rd L) arrives for the trial of his daughter Hyun-Ah at a court in Seoul on January 30, 2015. Cho apologised for his daughter's behaviour to a South Korean court, where she is on trial for air safety violations after a now notorious 'nut rage' incident. (AFP/Getty Images)