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Tue 1 Jul 2014 12:32 PM

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India’s low cost rocket

Prime Minister Narendra Modi hailed India's low-cost space technology saying a rocket which launched four foreign satellites into orbit had cost less to make than the Hollywood film 'Gravity.'

India’s low cost rocket
A Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) is launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) in the Indian town of Sriharikota on June 30, 2014. Prime Minister Narendra Modi hailed India's low-cost space technology saying a rocket which launched four foreign satellites into orbit had cost less to make than the Hollywood film 'Gravity.' India's domestically-produced Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) blasted off from the southern spaceport of Sriharikota, carrying satellites from France, Germany, Canada and Singapore. (AFP/Getty Images)
India’s low cost rocket
People in a field watch as an Indian communication satellite GSAT-12 onboard a Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV C-17 blasts off from the spaceport in Sriharikota on July 15, 2011. The GSAT-12 is aimed at augmenting the capacity in the Indian National Satellite (INSAT) system for various communication services like tele-education and tele-medicine, with a mission life of eight years. (AFP/Getty Images)
India’s low cost rocket
India's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV-C21, carrying the French SPOT-6 remote sensing satellite and the Japanese PROITERES micro-satellite as payload, blasts off from the launchpad at Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh state on September 9, 2012. The launch, which occured at 9:53am local time, was the 100th space mission by the Indian Space Research Organistion (ISRO). (AFP/Getty Images)
India’s low cost rocket
Chairman of The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) G.Madhavan Nair (C) gestures with fellow scientists as they attend a press conference at The Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota some 110kms north of Chennai on October 22, 2008, after the successful launch of the Indian spacecraft - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C11(PSLV) carring India's first unar probe Chandrayaan-1. India has successfully launched its first lunar mission, marking a major boost for the country's space programme and a new step in the fast-developing Asian space race. There were cheers in mission control as the unmanned lunar orbiting spacecraft Chandrayaan-1 was launched with an Indian-built rocket from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota on the southeastern coast. Officials said the lift-off, which took place in cloudy skies at 6:22 am (0052 GMT), was a 'great success', with the rocket placing the craft into a transfer orbit around the globe within 19 minutes. (AFP/Getty Images)
India’s low cost rocket
A model of the Chandrayaan-1 sits on display at a press conference at The Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota some 110kms north of Chennai on October 22, 2008, after the successful launch of the Indian spacecraft - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C11(PSLV) carring India's first Lunar probe Chandrayaan-1. India has successfully launched its first lunar mission, marking a major boost for the country's space programme and a new step in the fast-developing Asian space race. There were cheers in mission control as the unmanned lunar orbiting spacecraft Chandrayaan-1 was launched with an Indian-built rocket from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota on the southeastern coast. Officials said the lift-off, which took place in cloudy skies at 6:22 am (0052 GMT), was a 'great success', with the rocket placing the craft into a transfer orbit around the globe within 19 minutes. (AFP/Getty Images)
India’s low cost rocket
Chairman of The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) G.Madhavan Nair gestures as he attends a press conference at The Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota some 110kms north of Chennai on October 22, 2008, after the successful launch of the Indian spacecraft - Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle-C11(PSLV) carring India's first Lunar probe Chandrayaan-1. India has successfully launched its first lunar mission, marking a major boost for the country's space programme and a new step in the fast-developing Asian space race. There were cheers in mission control as the unmanned lunar orbiting spacecraft Chandrayaan-1 was launched with an Indian-built rocket from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota on the southeastern coast. Officials said the lift-off, which took place in cloudy skies at 6:22 am (0052 GMT), was a 'great success', with the rocket placing the craft into a transfer orbit around the globe within 19 minutes. (AFP/Getty Images)