Iranians celebrate Persian new year

Iranians shop for Nowruz, an ancient Zoroastrian festival starting on March 20
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Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Iranians shop for Noruz, the Persian New Year, at a market in Tehran on 19 March 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Green sprouts are sold in small clay containers at a market in Tehran for Noruz, the Persian New Year, on 19 March 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Iranians shop for Noruz, the Persian New Year, at a market in Tehran on 19 March 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Iranians shop for Noruz, the Persian New Year, at a market in Tehran on 19 March 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Goldfish swim in bowls at a market in Tehran on March 19, 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Iranians shop for Noruz, the Persian New Year, at a market in Tehran on 19 March 2012. Iranians are preparing to celebrate Noruz, an ancient Zoroastrian feast starting 20 March, by buying flowers, green plants and goldfish. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year marking 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Afghan woman prepares decorations for the New Year in Herat city on March 19, 2012. The celebration for Noruz, the start of the Afghan New Year, is one of the biggest festivals of the war-scarred nation. Noruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in the Persian calendar, calculated according to a solar calendar, this year falling on March 20, marking the year 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Afghan men and women prepare to celebrate the traditional New Year by purchasing gifts in Jalalabad on March 19, 2012, the celebrations for Noruz, the start of the Afghan New Year, is one of the biggest festivals of the war-scarred nation. Noruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in the Persian calendar. Noruz is calculated according to a solar calendar, this year falling on March 20, marking the year 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Afghan man sells decorations as Afghans prepare for their new year in Herat city on March 19, 2012. The celebration for Noruz, the start of the Afghan New Year, is one of the biggest festivals of the war-scarred nation. Noruz marks the first day of spring and the beginning of the year in the Persian calendar, calculated according to a solar calendar, this year falling on March 20, marking the year 1391. (AFP/Getty Images)