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Sun 30 Aug 2015 12:16 PM

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New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now

Hurricane Katrina could become the costliest storm in US history. It is estimated that 80 percent of New Orleans is under flood waters as levees begin to break and leak around Lake Ponchartrain.

New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(LEFT PHOTO) A woman walks along the perimeter of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on May 18, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(RIGHT PHOTO) The body of a female victim of Hurricane Katrina floats in the water surrounding the Superdome September 2, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Rescue efforts continue as officials in New Orleans and Mississippi fear the death toll from the devasting storm could be in the thousands. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) A resident stands in the Marrero Commons housing development, at the location where a B.W. Cooper housing project basketball court once stood, on May 17, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The low-income housing development, which was plagued by crime, has been replaced by two-story, townhouse-style buildings. The city has revamped its major housing projects following Katrina. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1,836 people and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) B.W. Cooper housing project residents play basketball in front of storm damaged apartments in the complex June 7, 2007 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Before Hurricane Katrina, B.W. Cooper held about 1,000 families and was the city's largest housing project, but it is now more than 80 percent empty. Around 10,000 public housing residents in New Orleans have been unable to return to their apartments because of storm damage. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to tear down B.W. Cooper and other major New Orleans housing projects and replace them with mixed income developments. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) New homes stand in a development built by the Make it Right Foundation for residents whose homes were destroyed in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 16, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) A group of Amish student volunteers tour the devastated Ninth Ward February 24, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) New homes stand along the rebuilt Industrial Canal levee in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 16, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Workers rebuild the levee which was breached by Hurricane Katrina along the Industrial Canal in the Lower Ninth Ward April 25, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Repair work on the New Orleans levees is scheduled to be finished in time for the start of hurricane season June 1. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) A man bikes past the corner of Flood Street and St. Claude Avenue in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 18, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Men ride in a boat in high water past Flood Street after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) The cemetery outside Saint Patrick's Church stands in Plaquemines Parish on May 16, 2015 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Water floods an above-ground cemetery outside Saint Patrick's Church in Plaquemines Parish September 11, 2005 in Port Sulphur, Louisiana. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO)- A woman walks with a dog in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 16, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1,836 people and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) A man rides in a canoe in high water after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) New homes stand in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 15, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) A lightning bolt strikes above a destroyed church in the Lower Ninth Ward August 5, 2006 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Dozens of churches were destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and have been left abandoned with only one functioning presently in the devastated Lower Ninth Ward. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) A school bus drops off a student in front of the Claiborne Bridge in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 12, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The neighborhood was devastated by flooding from Hurricane Katrina. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Two men paddle in high water after Hurricane Katrina devastated the area August 31, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Devastation is widespread throughout the city with water approximately 12 feet high in some areas. Hundreds are feared dead and thousands were left homeless in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida by the storm. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) - Rubble remains at the forner B.W. Cooper housing projects on May 12, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The low-income housing development, which was plagued by crime, has been replaced by two-story, townhouse-style buildings. The city has revamped its major housing projects following Katrina. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1,836 people and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) B.W. Cooper housing project residents practice flips using mattresses June 10, 2007 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The project is lacking in recreational areas. Before Hurricane Katrina, B.W. Cooper held about 1,000 families and was the city's largest housing project, but it is now more than 80 percent empty. Around 10,000 public housing residents in New Orleans have been unable to return to their apartments because of storm damage. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to tear down B.W. Cooper and other major New Orleans housing projects and replace them with mixed income developments. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) Houses stand in the 7th ward on May 12, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Robert Fontaine walks past a burning house fire in the 7th ward September 6, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Getty Images)
New Orleans after Katrina – Then and now
(TOP PHOTO) Parishioners gather during Sunday services in the rebuilt Christian Community Baptist Church in the Lower Ninth Ward on May 10, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, which killed at least 1836 and is considered the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history, is August 29.

\n(BOTTOM PHOTO) Duette Sims stands in a doorway of the heavily damaged Christian Community Baptist Church which he is helping to rebuild in the Lower Ninth Ward August 28, 2007 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Sims' own home in the Lower Ninth also heavily damaged in the flooding and he has yet to be able to return home. (Getty Images)