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Fri 31 Jul 2009 03:15 PM

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News of the world, July 31

News of the world, July 31
Demonstrators gather in Union Square to mark the 40th day since the death Neda Agha Soltan, a young woman who was killed during post-election protests last month in Tehran on July 30, 2009 in New York City. The violent death of Neda has become an international rallying cry for individuals opposed to the election results in Iran.(Getty Images)
News of the world, July 31
Myanmar residents of Japan attend a rally to demand the release of Myanmar democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, in front of the Myanmar Embassy in Tokyo on July 31, 2009. A Myanmar court has postponed its verdict in the internationally condemned trial of Aung San Suu Kyi until August 11, adding to uncertainty over the ruling junta's plans for the democracy icon. (Getty Images)
News of the world, July 31
Chinese workers load up the tree trunks they felled on a street in Beijing on July 30, 2009. Chinese authorities said that 210 billion yuan ($31bn) had been set aside for environmental protection in the four-trillion-yuan stimulus package allocated by the government to fight the global financial crisis. (Getty Images)
News of the world, July 31
A pile of peaches is dumped by fruit growers on July 31, 2009, in Perpignan, southern France, near the Spanish/French border. Growers set up the barrage to block the access to a market in a symbolic action to protest at French wholesalers and distributers who have not bought French produce as a priority, unlike previous years. (Getty Images)
News of the world, July 31
This picture taken in Shanghai on July 31, 2009 shows pages of a booklet distributed by the government in the city since 2005 which spells out who is eligible to have a second baby. As Shanghai faces the challenge of providing for its ageing population, the city's government recently reminded couples that they are eligible to have a second child. (Getty Images)
News of the world, July 31
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) enforcement assistance chief John Sellar holds a rhinoceros horn in his office on July 30, 2009 in Geneva. Sellar is no comic book super hero, but judging by the types of criminals he has to deal with as the only policeman at the UN agency against illegal wildlife trade, he could well be one. Russian mafia, Latin American druglords, perhaps some rebel or terror groups and crooked Asian diplomats count among poachers of rhinoceros, tigers and leopards whom Sellar aims to collar.

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