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Sun 15 Feb 2015 12:39 PM

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Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’

The Chinese lunar new 'year of the sheep' begins on February 19.

Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
A woman stands by a billboard depicting a sheep at a Chinese New Year fair in Hong Kong on February 13, 2015. The Chinese lunar new 'year of the sheep' begins on February 19. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
A woman stands by a display of soft toys for sale at a Chinese New Year fair in Hong Kong on February 13, 2015. The Chinese lunar new 'year of the sheep' begins on February 19. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
A farmer transports kumquat trees before selling them ahead of the Lunar New Year in Hanoi on February 13, 2015. The upcoming Lunar New Year bears the sign of the Sheep according to the lunar calendar. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Women dressed as Chinese ladies are seen at Sydney Harbour on February 13, 2015. Lanterns in the shape of the Chinese Terracotta Warriors, created for the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 by a team of Chinese artists, including Xia Nan are on display for the first time in Australia to launch the Australian celebrations of the Lunar New Year of the Sheep. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Visitors look at lanterns in the shape of the Chinese Terracotta Warriors at Sydney Harbour on February 13, 2015. The artworks, created for the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 by a team of Chinese artists, including Xia Nan is on display for the first time in Australia to launch the Australian celebrations of the Lunar New Year of the Sheep. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Visitors look at lanterns in the shape of the Chinese Terracotta Warriors at Sydney Harbour on February 13, 2015. The artworks, created for the Beijing Olympic Games in 2008 by a team of Chinese artists, including Xia Nan is on display for the first time in Australia to launch the Australian celebrations of the Lunar New Year of the Sheep. (AFP/Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Chinese people buy decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the sheep on February 12, 2015 in Beijing, China. The Chinese Lunar New Year of Sheep also known as the Spring Festival, which is based on the Lunisolar Chinese calendar, is celebrated from the first day of the first month of the lunar year and ends with Lantern Festival on the Fifteenth day. (Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Chinese people buy decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the sheep on February 12, 2015 in Beijing, China. The Chinese Lunar New Year of Sheep also known as the Spring Festival, which is based on the Lunisolar Chinese calendar, is celebrated from the first day of the first month of the lunar year and ends with Lantern Festival on the Fifteenth day. (Getty Images)
Preparations for the ‘New Year of the Goat’
Chinese people walking out a shopping mall after buy decorations for the upcoming Chinese Lunar New Year of the sheep on February 12, 2015 in Beijing, China. The Chinese Lunar New Year of Sheep also known as the Spring Festival, which is based on the Lunisolar Chinese calendar, is celebrated from the first day of the first month of the lunar year and ends with Lantern Festival on the Fifteenth day. (Getty Images)