REVEALED: 20 best restaurants in the world

Spanish restaurant El Celler de Can Roca has knocked Denmark’s celebrated Noma from the top spot in The World’s Best Restaurants Awards\n
98693463.jpg
1 of 20
20.\nRestaurant name: Narisawa\nLocation: Tokyo, Japan\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: A wild imagination and sense of drama from chef Yoshihiro Narisawa have ensured his restaurant remains one of the best in the world. A dedicated environmentalist, the chef blends classical French cooking techniques with strong flora aesthetics for a sublime manifestation of the country’s natural beauty and bounty.\n

The World's 50 Best Restaurants list organized by Britain's Restaurant magazine and sponsored by the mineral water company S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna.\n
\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
154249388.jpg
2 of 20
19.\nRestaurant name: Le Bernardin (Eric Ripert)\nLocation: New York, USA\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Simplicity, elegance and refinement are the qualities that characterise both the dishes and dining space at what is surely the world’s finest fish restaurant. At Le Bernardin the menu is split into Almost Raw, Barely Touched and Lightly Cooked sections, reflecting chef Eric Ripert’s focus on freshness, sourcing and delicate flavour combinations.\n
\nThe World's 50 Best Restaurants list organized by Britain's Restaurant magazine and sponsored by the mineral water company S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
105482701.jpg
3 of 20
18.\nRestaurant name: Le Chateaubriand (Inaki Aizpitarte)\nLocation: Paris, France\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Le Chateaubriand may be a forerunner of the Parisian neo-bistrot movement, but it’s also traditional, buzzy, egalitarian and brilliant. The daily-changing menu features ingredients chef Inaki Aizpitarte and his young passionate kitchen team have managed to get their hands on that day and springs surprises, with techniques ranging from French to Asian and South American.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
114294632.jpg
4 of 20
17.\nRestaurant name: Pujol (Enrique Olvera)\nLocation: Mexico City, Mexico\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Chef Enrique Olvera's stylish restaurant is Mexico’s finest. One of the leading exponents of new Mexican gastronomy, it is deeply immersed in the republic’s cultural legacy. Some dishes utilise time-honoured native seasonings, and dried insects also feature heavily.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
117504898.jpg
5 of 20
16.\nRestaurant name: L’Arpège (Alain Passard)\nLocation: Paris, France\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Alain Passard shocked the world when he eradicated red meat from his Parisian restaurant’s menus in 2001. Twelve years on, his idolisation of the humble vegetable has been mimicked across some of the world’s finest restaurants.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
Grant Achatz.jpg
6 of 20
15.\nRestaurant name: Alinea (Grant Achatz)\nLocation: Chicago, USA\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Few restaurants have had such a wide and immediate impact as Alinea, which burst onto the US scene in May 2005. Wowing Chicagoites, it stole the headlines for its food suspended on wires or plated onto the table.\n

\n(Image Credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org)
103092850.jpg
7 of 20
14.\nRestaurant name: Astrid y Gastón (Gastón Acurio)\nLocation: Lima, Peru\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Gastón Acurio has a fine-dining empire that now stretches from Madrid to New York, but this Miraflores original remains his signature eatery, epitomising not just his Peruvian- Mediterranean style but also his own character.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
The Ledbury.jpg
8 of 20
13.\nRestaurant name:The Ledbury\nLocation: London, UK\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Despite an increasingly weighty rep on the global gastronomic circuit, The Ledbury retains the vibe and outlook of a neighbourhood restaurant. Chef-patron Brett Graham has a down-to-earth attitude and a culinary approach that is Modern French with hints of Pacific and British.\n

\n(Image Credit: http://www.theledbury.com)
Frantzén_Lindeberg.jpg
9 of 20
12.\nRestaurant name: Frantzén/Lindeberg\nLocation: Stockholm, Sweden\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: From their bijou central Stockholm restaurant, chefs Björn Frantzen and Daniel Lindeberg have made major strides in proving that it’s not just their Danish counterparts who lead the Scandi food revolution. Their strengths lie in their use of an astonishing array of ingredients – 95% are from Sweden and many are plucked straight from the restaurant’s own garden – blended with Asian and Far Eastern cooking techniques.\n

\n(Image Credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org)
94457538.jpg
10 of 20
11.\nRestaurant name: Per Se\nLocation: New York, USA\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: What the judges said: Almost a decade old, Per Se has featured in this list for its entire life. Anyone dining in its plush but unshowy modern dining space could testify as to why: every dish – from chef-owner Thomas Keller’s classics such as ‘oysters and pearls’ to brilliant pastry chef Elwyn Boyles’ calvados parfait dessert – is a marvel.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
052603-Bistro-Vendome-MP167.jpg
11 of 20
10.\nRestaurant name: Vendôme\nLocation: Bergisch Gladbach, Germany
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Despite borrowing its name from the town in central France, Vendôme doesn’t serve French food. Far from it, in fact. Joachim Wissler’s restaurant is a proponent of neue Deutsche küche, a doctrine that sees German restaurants break away from Gallic influence.\n

\n(Image Credit:www.larimerassociates.com)
DSC_0374.jpg
12 of 20
9.\nRestaurant name: Steirereck\nLocation: Vienna, Austria\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Breaking into the top 10 for the first time this year, Steirereck chef-owner Heinz Reitbauer’s cooking is finally getting the attention it merits. Reitbauer’s dishes pillage his family’s Styrian roots for inspiration and unearth rare ingredients from the land and via Steirereck’s collection of cookbooks.\n

\n(Image Credit: www.erkocht.de)
106399271.jpg
13 of 20
8.\nRestaurant name: Arzak (Chef Juan Mari Arzak)\nLocation: San Sebastian, Spain\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: This family-run San Sebastián restaurant has living legend of Basque cuisine Juan Mari Arzak at the helm, alongside daughter Elena Arzak Espina, the World’s Best Female Chef in 2012. The pair tease out the best from local ingredients and food culture by reworking ideas using modern techniques.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
85392879.jpg
14 of 20
7.\nRestaurant name: Dinner by Heston Blumenthal (Chef Heston Blumenthal)\nLocation: London, UK\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Conceived by the legendary British chef and his increasingly influential right-hand men Ashley Palmer-Watts and James ‘Jocky’ Petrie, Dinner by Heston Blumenthal mines historical British recipes from as far back as the 14th century and reworks them using contemporary cooking techniques. What really makes a lasting impact, however, are the big flavour hits.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
143602986.jpg
15 of 20
6.\nRestaurant name: D.O.M (Chef Alex Atala)\nLocation: Sao Paulo, Brazil\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Part chef, part historian, part botanist, Alex Atala champions Brazil’s traditional ingredients and dishes. Familiar European fine dining fare gets a look-in at D.O.M. but often in supporting roles to the likes of cambuca fruit, manioc root and tucupi juice.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
162809828.jpg
16 of 20
5.\nRestaurant name: Eleven Madison Park (Chef Daniel Humm)\nLocation: New York, USA\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Chef Daniel Humm and general manager Will Guidara’s sleek Art Deco restaurant offers a masterclass in surprise. From the mysterious string-tied box that kicks off proceedings to the waiter affixing a meat grinder to the table midway through the meal, little can be anticipated.\n

\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
81252951.jpg
17 of 20
4.\nRestaurant name: Mugaritz\nLocation: San Sebastián, Spain\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: At Mugaritz diners are treated to a multiple-course tasting menu of intricate yet small dishes developed through a creative process and an attention to detail that borders on the obsessive. Chef-patron Andoni Luis Aduriz aims to play with guests and reflect on the different ways a restaurant can have an impact, rather than just filling people up and sending them on their way.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
133027417.jpg
18 of 20
3.\nRestaurant name: Osteria Francescana (Chef Osteria Francescana)\nLocation: Modena, Italy\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Tradition and modernity collide in spectacular fashion at Osteria Francescana with chef-patron Massimo Bottura’s sense of fun and headline-grabbing cooking. A new dish for this year is ‘camouflage’ – a thin layer of foie gras decorated with powders (hare blood, chestnut, various herbs), arranged to look like army woodland camo – but this is tempered by more traditional fare.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
143626476.jpg
19 of 20
2.\nRestaurant name: Noma\nLocation: Copenhagen, Denmark\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: Three-time number one Noma continues to take an innovative and inventive approach to both its cooking and its strictly local sourcing and foraging. Chef-patron René Redzepi’s food can at times be shocking – visceral even – but it strives to reflect the Danish landscape and culture.\n
\nThe World's 50 Best Restaurants list organized by Britain's Restaurant magazine and sponsored by the mineral water company S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna.\n

\n(Image Credit: AFP/Getty Images)
133076102.jpg
20 of 20
1.\nRestaurant name: El Celler de Can Roca (Chef Jordi Roca)\nLocation: Girona, Spain\n
\n
\nWhat the judges said: The Spanish favourite entered the World’s 50 Best list eight years ago and has somewhat stealthily climbed the rankings since. Its relatively low-key rise is reflective of the Rocas’ evolutionary approach and modest outlook. Owners, the Roca brothers grew up steeped in their mother’s restaurant in Girona’s working-class suburb of Taiala. In 1986, elder brothers Joan and Josep opened El Celler de Can Roca alongside the original.

\n
\nThe World's 50 Best Restaurants list organized by Britain's Restaurant magazine and sponsored by the mineral water company S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna.\n
To see the complete list of the 100 best restaurants in the world click here.\n
\n(Image Credit: Getty Images)
Wed 01 May 2013 02:13 PM GST