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Sun 6 Apr 2014 12:43 PM

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Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide

Crowd of people in Rwanda have gathered in advance of the official commemoration of the 1994 genocide which killed more than 800,000 people. The majority of those who died were ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus, who were slaughtered over a 100 day period. The genocide was planned by members of the political elite, and carried out by the Rwandan army, national police, government-backed militias, and some of the Hutu population. The UN was subsequently criticized for failing to intervene, and refusing to deploy stronger peacekeeping forces.

Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
People gather to commemorate the genocide of 1994 at the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers, who were part of the UNAMIR mission, were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
Dressed in traditional gowns, women line up before marching to commemorate the genocide of 1994 at the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers, who were part of the UNAMIR mission, were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
Men line up before marching to commemorate the genocide of 1994 at the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers, who were part of the UNAMIR mission, were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
The Kwibuka Flame of Remembrance is carried into the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch to commemorate the 2,000 people who were abandoned by United Nations troops during the 1994 genocide April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers who were part of the UNAMIR mission were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
Family photos of victims of the 1994 Rwanda genocide hang inside the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
Visitors look at family photos of victims of the 1994 Rwanda genocide hang inside the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
Dressed in traditional gowns, women line up before marching to commemorate the genocide of 1994 at the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers, who were part of the UNAMIR mission, were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)
Rwanda prepares to mark ’94 genocide
The Kwibuka Flame of Remembrance is carried into the Kicukiro College of Technology football pitch to commemorate the 2,000 people who were abandoned by United Nations troops during the 1994 genocide April 5, 2014 in Kigali, Rwanda. On April 11, 1994, Belgian paratroopers who were part of the UNAMIR mission were ordered to leave the school grounds, abandoning the people to the national police and Interahamwe militia, who lead their victims to a garbage dump and slaughtered them. Rwanda is preparing to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the country's 1994 genocide, when more than 800,000 ethnic Tutsi and moderate Hutus were slaughtered over a 100 day period. (Getty Images)