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Mon 31 Aug 2015 12:17 PM

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Saudi women - candidates and voters

Saudi Arabia allowed women to register to stand in local elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom.

Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi women hold applications as they head to register to vote in the port city of Jeddah on August 30, 2015. Saudi Arabia allowed women to register to stand in local elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom. In a country where women face a host of restrictions including a driving ban, the move was welcomed as an important step forward. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi women hold applications as they head to register to vote in the port city of Jeddah on August 30, 2015. Saudi Arabia allowed women to register to stand in local elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom. In a country where women face a host of restrictions including a driving ban, the move was welcomed as an important step forward. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
A Saudi woman holds an application as she heads to register to vote in the port city of Jeddah on August 30, 2015. Saudi Arabia allowed women to register to stand in local elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom. In a country where women face a host of restrictions including a driving ban, the move was welcomed as an important step forward. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi women wait for their drivers outside a shopping mall in Riyadh on September 26, 2011 a day after King Abdullah granted women the right to vote and run in municipal elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative country where women are subjected to many restrictions. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi women wait in line in the 'women section' at of a fast food restaurant in the 'Faysalia' mall in Riyadh City, on September 26, 2011, a day after Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz al-Saud granted women the right to vote and run in municipal elections, in a historic first for the ultra-conservative country where women are subjected to many restrictions. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi women leave a polling station after voting during elections 20 February 2006 for the board of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry in al-Qatif in Saudi Arabia's oil-rich Eastern Province, north of Riyadh. Half a dozen Saudi women are running for the board, confident that they will make inroads in the hitherto male-only body. If women clinch one or more seats on the board, which will have 12 elected members and another six appointed by the trade and industry minister, they would be repeating the groundbreaking victory of counterparts in the Red Sea city of Jeddah, who won two of the 12 seats up for grabs there last November. (AFP/Getty Images)
Saudi women - candidates and voters
Saudi newspapers carry advertisements calling people to register for the unprecedented municipal elections in the oil-rich kingdom, 22 November 2004. The first round of the elections is scheduled for February 10 in Riyadh where Saudi men will kick-off the three-stage process of electing half the members of 178 municipal councils. The first nationwide elections, which will see male prisoners allowed to vote but women barred, is part of a drive to introduce limited reforms which Riyadh insists must be tailored to Saudi specifications and not necessarily follow a western pattern. (AFP/Getty Images)