Stop the Ivory Trade

A recent study by Save the Elephants found that around 100,000 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2010 and 2012, driven by demand from the new consumers in China and Southeast Asia.
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Hong Kong lawmaker Elizabeth Quat (R) poses with a juvenile elephant as she visits the David Sheldricks orphan elephant foundation in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, on September 13, 2014. Elizabeth Quat is in Kenya as part of her campaign to stop the ivory business and end the killing of elephants, organized in partnership with WildAid, Save the Elephants, the African Wildlife Foundation, the Northern Rangelands Trust and Stop Ivory. A recent study by Save the Elephants found that around 100,000 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2010 and 2012, driven by demand from the new consumers in China and Southeast Asia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Hong Kong lawmaker Elizabeth Quat (R) poses with a juvenile elephant as she visits the David Sheldricks orphan elephant foundation in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, on September 13, 2014. Elizabeth Quat is in Kenya as part of her campaign to stop the ivory business and end the killing of elephants, organized in partnership with WildAid, Save the Elephants, the African Wildlife Foundation, the Northern Rangelands Trust and Stop Ivory. A recent study by Save the Elephants found that around 100,000 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2010 and 2012, driven by demand from the new consumers in China and Southeast Asia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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A man stands next to young elephants at the David Sheldricks orphan elephant foundation in the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, on September 13, 2014. Hong Kong's lawmaker Elizabeth Quat visited the place as part of her campaign to stop the ivory business and end the killing of elephants, organized in partnership with WildAid, Save the Elephants, the African Wildlife Foundation, the Northern Rangelands Trust and Stop Ivory. A recent study by Save the Elephants found that around 100,000 elephants were killed for their tusks between 2010 and 2012, driven by demand from the new consumers in China and Southeast Asia. (AFP/Getty Images)
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This photograph taken by a villager on August 21, 2014, shows a man placing a fruit on a dead baby Sumatran elephant found in a river in Serbajadi in East Aceh district in Aceh province, located near the Leuser ecosystem forest conservation area in Indonesia's Sumatra island, in the latest series of deaths of the critically-endangered Sumatran elephant. According to wildlife officials, dozens of the elephants have died after being poisoned in recent years on Sumatra Island, as the creatures come into conflict with humans due to the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations which destroys their habitat. Swathes of rainforest have been destroyed in recent years to make way for plantations and villagers increasingly target Sumatran elephants, which they regard as pests. (AFP/Getty Images)
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This photograph taken by a villager on August 21, 2014, shows a man holding the snout of a dead baby Sumatran elephant found in a river in Serbajadi in East Aceh district in Aceh province, located near the Leuser ecosystem forest conservation area in Indonesia's Sumatra island, in the latest series of deaths of the critically-endangered Sumatran elephant. According to wildlife officials, dozens of the elephants have died after being poisoned in recent years on Sumatra Island, as the creatures come into conflict with humans due to the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations which destroys their habitat. Swathes of rainforest have been destroyed in recent years to make way for plantations and villagers increasingly target Sumatran elephants, which they regard as pests. (AFP/Getty Images)
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In this photograph taken on August 29, 2014, a mahout for the elephant patrol unit run by Leuser International Foundation prepares his Sumatran elephant for a patrol in Langkat District, North Sumatra Province, located near the Leuser ecosystem forest conservation area in Indonesia's Sumatra Island. According to wildlife officials, dozens of the elephants have died after being poisoned in recent years on Sumatra Island, as the creatures come into conflict with humans due to the rapid expansion of palm oil plantations which destroys their habitat. Swathes of rainforest have been destroyed in recent years to make way for plantations and villagers increasingly target Sumatran elephants, which they regard as pests. (AFP/Getty Images)