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Thu 10 Apr 2014 11:34 AM

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Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat

Pepsi Art House joins forces with regional artists

Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
A four-day event, which took place at Dubai International Financial Centre, saw four local artists “Pepsify” a range of everyday objects during live performances at the Pepsi Art House.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
From a foosball table to a fridge and a quad bike; ten unique pieces were created in a four hour live performance showcasing each of the artist’s signature style and individuality.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
Corrine Martin is a Lebanese artist who’s unique style features a retro pop art creations. Pop Art is anything that pulls from regular culture and Martin describes her art as being very nostalgic and from the 50’s era in the Middle East.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
“I moved from Houston to Riyadh, had so much free time and was painting like a mad person. I got picked up by Lam Art gallery and we started doing fairs such as Abu Dhabi Art and Beirut Art, so I got to have my stuff shown all over the place,” she said. “I’m very involved in social media, because it is the only way to communicate with the outside world while living in Riyadh. There’s a big Pop Art Scene happening in Saudi right now and I was at the right place at the right time in Saudi five years ago and pushed that.”
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
Emirati Sketcher Humaid Mansoor painted two stools, a lamp shade and a chest of drawers for Pepsi Art House. “I’m a very visual person and the kind of art I used to connect is always filled with bright colours because it makes me feel happy,” he said.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
Mansoor was born and brought up in the UAE but went to university in Canada to pursue a degree in Business. “I’ve been painting drawing sketching since I was a kid and I had to let it go when I went for my undergrad. But it was in Montreal where I rekindled with art. Since then I’ve been painting for family friends and just a few years ago I came out of the art closet,” he said.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
“Part of my hesitation was that I hadn’t formally studied art and I didn’t know how people would perceive it and what they would make of my artistic expressions,” stated Mansoor who explains that his personal style is very abstract calligraphy, but he would rather not call it calligraphy since that title is reserved for an art form that adheres to a certain set of rules that he does not apply to his work.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
“Live painting is intimidating. Painting for me is a very personal thing. I’m always in my little studio or my room doing what I do and if I make a mistake I could always correct it without anyone noticing. Sometimes you make something you don’t like and you don’t necessarily have to show it to anyone. But with live painting it becomes a bit of a challenge because you have to show everyone exactly what you are working on. It needs to be the finished product, it needs to be perfect,” Humaid stated.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
Chilean Lebanese artist Bechara Baroudi describes his style as Cartoonish, with a little bit of neo-Orientalist, and a little bit of street art. If that’s not unique, I don’t know what is.
Street Art auction rocks DIFC’s Art Beat
Coming from a family with many artists, his life between South America and Lebanon is at the root of his personal aesthetic and artistic approach. “It’s been an eternal cross-over. Cultures, people you see all over the world and people you know all influence my work. For me one of one of the most inspiring countries in the world is Lebanon,” said Baroudi.