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Wed 4 Feb 2015 12:54 PM

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The world mourns Jordanian pilot

Jordanian pilot First Lieutenant Maaz al-Kassasbeh, 26-year-old, was burned alive in a cage, in the jihadists' most brutal execution yet of a foreign hostage. Kassasbeh, who hails from a town near Karak, was captured on December 24 2014, after his F-16 jet crashed during a mission over northern Syria as part of the US-led campaign against the jihadists.

The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Supporters and family members of Jordanian pilot First Lieutenant Maaz al-Kassasbeh, 26-year-old, gather following his reported killing, at the Karak tribal gathering chamber or Diwan, in the Jordanian capital Amman on February 3, 2015. The Islamic State group released a video purportedly showing the Jordanian pilot being burned alive in a cage, in the jihadists' most brutal execution yet of a foreign hostage. Kassasbeh, who hails from a town near Karak, was captured on December 24 2014, after his F-16 jet crashed during a mission over northern Syria as part of the US-led campaign against the jihadists. Jordan will execute on February 4, 2015, an Iraqi woman Sajida al-Rishawi on death row over a failed bombing after having vowed to avenge the murder of a Jordanian pilot by Islamic State jihadists, an official said. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Jordanians gather following the reported killing of Jordanian pilot First Lieutenant Maaz al-Kassasbeh, 26-years-old, in the capital Amman, on February 3, 2015. The Islamic State group released a video purportedly showing the Jordanian pilot being burned alive in a cage, in the jihadists' most brutal execution yet of a foreign hostage. Kassasbeh, who hails from a town near Karak, was captured on December 24 2014, after his F-16 jet crashed during a mission over northern Syria as part of the US-led campaign against the jihadists. Jordan will execute on February 4, 2015, an Iraqi woman Sajida al-Rishawi on death row over a failed bombing after having vowed to avenge the murder of a Jordanian pilot by Islamic State jihadists, an official said. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Supporters and family members of Jordanian pilot First Lieutenant Maaz al-Kassasbeh, 26-year-old, say prayers following his reported killing, at the Karak tribal gathering chamber or Diwan, in the Jordanian capital Amman on February 3, 2015. The Islamic State group released a video purportedly showing the Jordanian pilot being burned alive in a cage, in the jihadists' most brutal execution yet of a foreign hostage. Kassasbeh, who hails from a town near Karak, was captured on December 24 2014, after his F-16 jet crashed during a mission over northern Syria as part of the US-led campaign against the jihadists. Jordan will execute on February 4, 2015, an Iraqi woman Sajida al-Rishawi on death row over a failed bombing after having vowed to avenge the murder of a Jordanian pilot by Islamic State jihadists, an official said. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
US President Barack Obama meets with King Abdullah II of Jordan in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, February 3, 2015. The hastily arranged meeting follows the release by the Islamic State of a video showing the apparent burning alive of a Jordanian pilot who had been captured late last year. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Pedestrians walk past a huge screen reporting on Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh in Tokyo on February 4, 2015. Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe condemned the apparent execution by the Islamic State group of a Jordanian pilot as 'unforgivable' on February 4, days after the murders of two Japanese hostages. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks at the Lower House's budget committee session at the National Diet in Tokyo on February 4, 2015. Abe condemned the apparent execution by the Islamic State group of a Jordanian pilot as 'unforgivable', days after the murders of two Japanese hostages. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Activists carry posters with a portrait of the Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh, who was captured by Islamic State (IS) group militants on December 24 after his F-16 jet crashed while on a mission against the jihadists over northern Syria, during a rally calling for the release of Al-Kassasbeh in the Jordanian capital Amman on February 3, 2015. Jordan vowed to do all it could to save the pilot held by IS after the jihadists killed a Japanese journalist they had been holding. IS has been demanding the release of an Iraqi jihadist on death row in Jordan in exchange for Kassasbeh's life, and Amman said it would hand her over if given proof that he is still alive. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Anwar Tarawneh (C), the wife of Jordanian pilot Maaz al-Kassasbeh, who was captured by Islamic State (IS) group militants on December 24 after his F-16 jet crashed while on a mission against the jihadists over northern Syria, sheds a tear during a rally calling for the release of her captive husband in the Jordanian capital Amman on February 3, 2015. Jordan vowed to do all it could to save the pilot held by IS after the jihadists killed a Japanese journalist they had been holding. IS has been demanding the release of an Iraqi jihadist on death row in Jordan in exchange for Kassasbeh's life, and Amman said it would hand her over if given proof that he is still alive. (AFP/Getty Images)
The world mourns Jordanian pilot
Jordanians take part in a candle light vigil to condemn the killing of the two Japanese hostages, Haruna Yukawa and Kenji Goto, by the Islamic State group and to show support for the people of Japan, on February 2, 2015 outside the Japanese embassy in Amman. The UN Security Council demanded the immediate release of all hostages held by the Islamic State group, as Jordan vowed to do everything it can to save the life of a pilot captured by the militants. (AFP/Getty Images)