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Tue 28 May 2013 11:11 AM

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Thousands attend cheese rolling race

Crowds flock to unique British event, where hundreds of people partake in a cheese-chasing race down Cooper’s Hill in Brockworth

Thousands attend cheese rolling race
Contestants in the men's race chase a replica double Gloucester cheese down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
Contestants in the men's race chase a cheese down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
Colorada Springs-based American, Kenny Rackers celebrates winning the first race at Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
A man falls down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
Contestants in the men's race chase a Double Gloucester Cheese down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
A man falls down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
A woman falls down the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill during the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
People wear handmade t-shirts as they wait forthe annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling to start on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
A sign warns people at the top of the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill of dangers of the annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling to start on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)
Thousands attend cheese rolling race
People sit at the top of the steep gradient of Cooper's Hill as they wait forthe annual Bank Holiday tradition of cheese-rolling to start on May 27, 2013 in Brockworth, Gloucestershire, England. Although no longer a officially organised event since 2009, thousands of spectators still gathered to watch contestants from around the world tumbling down the 200m slope, which has a 1:1 gradient in parts, in a series of races that are said to date back hundreds of years, with the winner of each receiving a cheese. Injuries such as broken arms and legs are commonplace. (Getty Images)