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Mon 12 Oct 2015 12:34 PM

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Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally

Around 95 people were killed on October 10 in the Turkish capital Ankara when bombs set off by two suspected suicide attackers ripped through leftist and pro-Kurdish activists gathering for an anti-government peace rally, the deadliest attack in the history of modern Turkey.

Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
A protestor writes on the road in Turkish as he and others gathers during a commemoration of the Saturday's bomb blast on October 11, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Scuffles broke out as police prevented pro-Kurdish politicians and other mourners from laying carnations at the site of two suspected suicide bombings that killed 95 people and wounded hundreds in Turkey's deadliest attack in years. Police insisted investigators were still working at the site. Turkish PM Davutoglu declares three days of national mourning over Ankara bomb attacks. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Protestors gather in a square during a commemoration for the victims of Saturday's bomb blasts in the Turkish capital, on October 11, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Scuffles broke out as police prevented pro-Kurdish politicians and other mourners from laying carnations at the site of two suspected suicide bombings that killed 95 people and wounded hundreds in Turkey's deadliest attack in years. Police insisted investigators were still working at the site. Turkish PM Davutoglu declares three days of national mourning over Ankara bomb attacks. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Members of the left-wing Labour Party (EMEP) carry pictures of the victims of Saturday's bomb blasts during a commemoration on October 11, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Scuffles broke out as police prevented pro-Kurdish politicians and other mourners from laying carnations at the site of two suspected suicide bombings that killed 95 people and wounded hundreds in Turkey's deadliest attack in years. Police insisted investigators were still working at the site. Turkish PM Davutoglu declares three days of national mourning over Ankara bomb attacks. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Members of the left-wing Labour Party (EMEP) carry pictures of the victims of Saturday's bomb blasts during a commemoration on October 11, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Scuffles broke out as police prevented pro-Kurdish politicians and other mourners from laying carnations at the site of two suspected suicide bombings that killed 95 people and wounded hundreds in Turkey's deadliest attack in years. Police insisted investigators were still working at the site. Turkish PM Davutoglu declares three days of national mourning over Ankara bomb attacks. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
A protester leaves the carnations on the ground by a police barricade blocking the way to the site of Saturday's explosions on October 11, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Scuffles broke out as police prevented pro-Kurdish politicians and other mourners from laying carnations at the site of two suspected suicide bombings that killed 95 people and wounded hundreds in Turkey's deadliest attack in years. Police insisted investigators were still working at the site. Turkish PM Davutoglu declares three days of national mourning over Ankara bomb attacks. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
People take part in a demonstration organised by the Kurdish Democratic Council of France on Place de la Republique in Paris, on October 11, 2015, in support of the victims of the suicide bomb attack which occurred in Ankara on October 10. Turkey woke in mourning after at least 95 people were killed by suspected suicide bombers at a peace rally of leftist and pro-Kurdish activists in Ankara, the deadliest such attack in the country's recent history. Thousands also took to the streets in solidarity in Paris, Strasbourg and Marseille in France, as well as in Zurich in Switzerland. The banner reads 'Custody, Bloody Attacks, Isolation'. (AFP/Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Placards reading 'Killer state' are seen as thousands of protesters take part in a march against the deadly attack earlier in Ankara on October 10, 2015 at the Istiklal avenue in Istanbul. At least 86 people were killed on October 10 in the Turkish capital Ankara when bombs set off by two suspected suicide attackers ripped through leftist and pro-Kurdish activists gathering for an anti-government peace rally, the deadliest attack in the history of modern Turkey. (AFP/Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Turkish security forces and forensic police inspect the blast site after an explosion during a peace march on October 10, 2015 in Ankara, Turkey. Turkish Health Minister says 86 people have been killed and 186 wounded in twin bomb blasts outside the main train station in the Turkish capital Ankara where people were gathering for a peace march. (Getty Images)
Turkey mourns victims of Ankara peace rally
Survivors stand amongst the dead and injured at the blast scene after an explosion during a peace march in Ankara, October 10, 2015 Turkey. Turkish Health Minister says 86 people killed and 186 wounded in twin bomb blasts outside the main train station in the Turkish capital Ankara where people were gathering for a peace march. (Getty Images)