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Thu 26 Jun 2014 12:09 PM

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US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy

The US Supreme Court issued a ruling requiring law enforcement officials to have a search warrant to search the cellphones of suspects they arrest. In another case, the court ruled that the streaming service Aereo was in violation of existing copyright law by retransmitting broadcast televisions programmes via miniature antennas for a fee from the company's subscribers.

US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
The U.S. Supreme Court is shown after members of the court issued major rulings on cell phone privacy and copyright law June 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court issued a ruling requiring law enforcement officials to have a search warrant to search the cell phones of suspects they arrest. In another case, the court ruled that the streaming service Aereo was in violation of existing copyright law by retransmitting broadcast televisions programs via miniature antennas for a fee from the company’s subscribers. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
Kirsten Luna from Holland, Michigan, uses her smartphone outside the U.S. Supreme Court after a major ruling on cell phone privacy by the court June 25, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court issued a ruling requiring law enforcement officials to have a search warrant to search the cell phones of suspects they arrest. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
Paul Clement, the attorney for the broadcasters, speaks to members of the media in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments April 22, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case against Aereo on the companies profiting from rebroadcasting network TVs programs obtained from public airwaves. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia leaves the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments April 22, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case against Aereo on the companies profiting from rebroadcasting network TVs programs obtained from public airwaves. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia (R) and members of the media listen to a statement from Kanojia's attorney in front of the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments April 22, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case against Aereo on the company's profiting from rebroadcasting network TVs programs obtained from public airwaves. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia (2nd R) leaves the U.S. Supreme Court after oral arguments April 22, 2014 in Washington, DC. The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case against Aereo on the company's profiting from rebroadcasting network TVs programs obtained from public airwaves. (Getty Images)
US Supreme Court rules in favour of cellphone privacy
In this photo illustration, Aereo.com, a web service that provides television shows online, is shown on an iPad Mini, on April 22, 2014 in New York City. Aereo is going head-to-head against ABC, a major television network, in a court case being heard by the Supreme Court. (Getty Images)