World prepares for Eid celebrations

Muslims across the world are making preparations for Eid Al Adha, or ‘feast of sacrifice’, which marks the end of the annual hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered during the celebrations, remembering prophet Abraham’s readiness to sacrifice his son to God, with their meat distributed to the poor and needy.
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In this photograph taken on October 13, 2013, a cow is prepared for Eid Al Adha in the neighborhood in Indonesia's capital city of Jakarta. Eid Al Adha is celebrated throughout the Muslim world in remembrance of Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to God with cows and goats are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Volunteers from the charity organisation Saaed make sweets for distribution to the needy as Muslims prepare for Eid Al Adha, the Muslim feast of sacrifice which marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage, in Damascus on October 13, 2013. The annual pilgrimage or Hajj to the Saudi holy city of Mecca is one of the five pillars of Islam and Eid Al Adha is celebrated in remembrance of Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to God. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Sheep stand in a pen at a livestock market in Kuwait City on October 13, 2013 ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid Al Adha or the 'Feast of Sacrifice' which marks the end of the annual pilgrimage or Hajj to the Saudi holy city of Mecca and is celebrated in remembrance of Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to God. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Kuwaiti men check sheep at a livestock market in Kuwait City on October 13, 2013 ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid Al Adha or the 'Feast of Sacrifice' which marks the end of the annual pilgrimage or Hajj to the Saudi holy city of Mecca and is celebrated in remembrance of Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to God. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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A Kuwaiti vendor holds a sheep as he waits for customers at a livestock market in Kuwait City on October 13, 2013 ahead of the Muslim holiday of Eid Al Adha or the 'Feast of Sacrifice' which marks the end of the annual pilgrimage or Hajj to the Saudi holy city of Mecca and is celebrated in remembrance of Abraham's readiness to sacrifice his son to God. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Pakistani men lead a camel as they ride a motorcycle after buying the animal from a livestock market in Lahore on October 13, 2013. Eid is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God, with cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest days. (AFP/Getty Images)
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A Yemeni girl stands next to her live stock as she waits for buyers at an animal market in the capital Sanaa on October 13, 2013, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid Al Adha. Eid Al Adha or the Festival of Sacrifice is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God. Cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on this holy day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Baklava pastries sit on October 13, 2013 at a bakery in Pristina during the preparations for the Muslim feast of sacrifice, known in Arabic as Eid Al Adha. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid Al Adha by visiting the tombs of their loved ones and slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Afghan girl looks on as her parents shop in a market in Herat on October 13, 2013, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid Al Adha. Eid Al Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God, and cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest day. (AFP/Getty Images)
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An Afghan woman vendor waits for customers to sell her sheep at an animal market on the outskirts of Mazar-i-Sharif on October 13, 2013, ahead of the Muslim feast of Eid Al Adha. Eid Al Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice) is celebrated throughout the Muslim world as a commemoration of Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son for God, and cows, camels, goats and sheep are traditionally slaughtered on the holiest day. (AFP/Getty Images)