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Mon 12 Mar 2018 09:16 AM

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Continental Investments launches $270m project in Dubailand

70% of the Rukan Residence project has been allocated for public spaces and green areas

Continental Investments launches $270m project in Dubailand
Rukan Residence project will include a commercial area consisting of retail space and entertainment facilities, including tennis courts, a sports club, running and cycling routes, a nursery and a mosque.

Continental Investments has launched its latest project, the $272 million (AED 1 billion) Rukan Residence in Dubailand.

The new project, located next to Arabian Ranches, includes a serviced residential complex made up of villas, townhouses, twin houses, studios and luxury apartments, with 70 percent of the total area allocated for public open areas and green spaces.

Additionally, the Rukan Residence project will include a commercial area consisting of retail space and entertainment facilities, including tennis courts, a sports club, running and cycling routes, a nursery and a mosque.

“The 2.6 million-square-foot project reflects the increase in demand in the real estate sector in Dubai,” said Ahmad Sabbour, the CEO of Continental Investments.

“The retail spaces, entertainment facilities and homes are surrounded by green areas with designs that reflect our main priority: that residents experience a positive and inspiring environment with strong humanitarian values.

"We are confident in the ability of Dubai's market ability to draw to foreign investment, providing returns that are from the top regionally,” he added.

According to Continental Investments, the Rukan Residence project forms part of the company’s larger efforts to expand, following the success of the $108 million (AED 400 million) Continental Tower in Dubai Marina.

Continental Investments was formed by the Cairo-based Landmark Sabbour in 2011.

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