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Sun 6 Mar 2016 01:03 PM

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Survey reveals three in four UAE teachers are "looking for a new job"

Higher salaries are primary motivation for majority of teachers considering a move

Survey reveals three in four UAE teachers are "looking for a new job"

Results from WhichSchoolAdvisor's Teacher Survey reveal that almost three quarters of 531 surveyed teachers in the UAE are actively looking for a new position.

Higher salaries are the primary motivation for 73% of respondents who said they would consider moving immediately.

Only 8% of teachers said they received a salary increase last year, and 16% received a pay raise, but below inflation. Nearly half (45%) of respondents, however, said they had no pay rise at all.

Among the 531 respondents to the survey, 24 were principals. More than 48% of respondents were in Dubai and 43% in Abu Dhabi with the remainder across the other emirates.

Shaun Robinson, partner at UAE Learning Network commented: "When three out of four members of your staff room are actively searching job websites, there is a big issue. Salary is consistently a problem across all curricula and across all salary levels."

Teacher recruitment and retention continues to remain a challenge in the Gulf, with a recent Reuters report stating more than 14,000 teachers are needed in international schools in the UAE over the next five years.

WhichSchoolAdvisor co-founder James Mullan noted: "From our studies we know that for parents the quality of teaching talent is a top consideration when it comes to assessing the right school for their child. The worry is that, with a well-publicised teacher shortage gathering pace among international schools across the globe, the UAE could be left behind in the 'talent race'."

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Peter 4 years ago

Its sad that as teachers we are expected to perform at our best 24/7. Its not always about the money( even thou we need to eat) but more so about the working environment. I have been teaching for a number of years and in different places. Some great and some not so great. Teaching in Dubai however is one of the places where self entitlement is king.
All students deserve the best but some parents feel that their kid is more deserving than others. What parents don't know is the pressure that they place on individual teachers and the school is the biggest contributor to Teachers leaving the profession.
We often get told: "You chose this life, now shut up and get on with it". This attitude tends to manifest itself in our students as well. Kids learn to say things that they hear at home.
We have chosen our profession and any professional teacher works their backsides off for their students, even though they get abused by parents and students. Money is not everything.

MT3 4 years ago

It might be 24/7 (which it isn't) but it's only for 35-40 weeks a year - most people are lucky to get 4 weeks holiday a year let alone 12 weeks plus and these include people who are paying your salaries by paying for their kids' education; they work in industries where extremely high demands are placed upon them and they have to perform so why should teachers be any different.

Peter 4 years ago

It's sad that as teachers we are expected to perform at our best 24/7. Its not always about the money (even thou we need to eat) but more so about the working environment. I have been teaching for a number of years and in different places. Some great and some not so great. Teaching in Dubai however is one of the places where self entitlement is king.
All students deserve the best but some Parents feel that their kid is more deserving than others. What parents don't know is the pressure that they place on individual teachers and the school is the biggest contributor to Teachers leaving the profession.
We often get told " You chose this live, now shut up and get on with it " . this attitude tends to manifest it self in our students as well. kids learn to say things that they hear at home.
We have chosen our profession and any professional teacher works their back sides off for their students. Even thou they get abused by parents and students. Money is not everything