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Sun 28 Mar 2010 08:00 AM

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Welcome to the Power 100 2010

COMING UP: The Power 100 rankings from 80-61 will be revealed at 9am.

Welcome to the Power 100 2010
\n

Welcome to the
Arabian Business Power 100

for 2010, our annual list of the world's most influential Arabs.


Click here to view the list

.

This year, we're releasing our
list

in phases, starting with numbers 100-81. Click
here

to see the 2010 list so far.

The entries further up the
list

will be revealed at hourly intervals, culminating with the top 10 list being published at 1pm.

This year’s
Power 100

boasts 49 fresh faces with six newcomers making the top 10.

Our highest new entry rockets in at number 2 and is at the centre of one of the world's biggest news stories in 2010.

Another new entry at number 3 is the first veiled Muslim woman to be appointed to the White House under Barack Obama.

After losing the top spot in 2009 to Saudi Arabia, the UAE has fought back this year to gain supremacy by fielding a total of 17 Power 100 representatives.

Egypt follows with 16 Power List winners while Saudi Arabia has slipped to joint third place with 15, alongside Lebanon.

The top five is completed by Syria with 12 entries.

A notable absence from
last year’s Power 100

, Algeria makes a welcome return this year with a football legend storming into the top 50.

The biggest riser in this year's list is an aviation pioneer who jumps 79 places into the number 8 position.

To find out who he is - and who else is featured in the first 80 Power List places, make sure you log back on to Arabian Business later.

How countries fared in this year's Power 100:

17 - UAE

16 - Egypt

15 - Saudi Arabia

15 - Lebanon

12 - Syria

6 - Palestine

5 - Kuwait

4 - Jordan

2 - Bahrain

2 - Tunisia

2 - Iraq

2 - Tunisia

1 - Oman

1 - Algeria

1 - Qatar

1 - Libya

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