In pictures: Monster storm Florence dumping 'epic amounts of rainfall' in US

Authorities on Saturday warned residents displaced by a killer hurricane that its devastation was far from over, as Florence dumped "epic amounts of rainfall" across the southeastern United States, bringing catastrophic flooding and up to 13 deaths.
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Waves crash into the Second Avenue Pier as Hurricane Florence makes landfall late on September 14, 2018 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. A woman and her baby were killed when a tree fell on their house and at least two other storm-related deaths were reported on September 14, 2018 as Hurricane Florence slammed into the Carolinas, dousing the eastern US states with torrential rain and causing rivers to burst their banks.
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Members of Onslow County emergency look to see if a passenger was still in a car that was overtaken by flooding on US Route 17 outside of Jacksonville, North Carolina on September 15, 2018 during Tropical Storm Florence. The governor of North Carolina on Saturday warned residents displaced by a killer storm against returning home because of the dangers posed by rising floodwaters. 'Know that water is rising fast everywhere, even in places that don't typically flood,' said Governor Roy Cooper. 'This system is unloading epic amounts of rainfall: in some places, measured in feet, not inches.'
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A tree that fell on a house, killing two people, is seen during Hurricane Florence in Wilmington, North Carolina on September 14, 2018. A mother and her infant were killed when a tree fell on their house in Wilmington, North Carolina, the first reported fatalities from Hurricane Florence, police said Friday. Wilmington police tweeted that the father was transported to the hospital with unspecified injuries. Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wilmington on Friday morning, battering the coastal city with strong winds and torrential rain.
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A home sits in flood water outside Maysville, NC on September 14, 2018 during Hurricane Florence. Florence smashed into the US East Coast Friday with howling winds, torrential rains and life-threatening storm surges as emergency crews scrambled to rescue hundreds of people stranded in their homes by flood waters. Forecasters warned of catastrophic flooding and other mayhem from the monster storm, which is only Category 1 but physically sprawling and dangerous.
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The Neuse River floods the waterfront in New Bern, North Carolina, on September 14, 2018 during Hurricane Florence.
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A woman holds a baby as she watches rising flood waters on the Cape Fear River during Hurricane Florence in Wilmington, North Carolina on September 14, 2018. Florence smashed into the US East Coast Friday with howling winds, torrential rains and life-threatening storm surges as emergency crews scrambled to rescue hundreds of people stranded in their homes by flood waters. Forecasters warned of catastrophic flooding and other mayhem from the monster storm, which is only Category 1 but physically sprawling and dangerous.
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Rain begins to fall as the outer bands of Hurricane Florence make landfall in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina on September 13, 2018. Hurricane Florence edged closer to the east coast of the Hurricane Florence edged closer to the east coast of the US Thursday, with tropical-force winds and rain already lashing barrier islands just off the North Carolina mainland. The huge storm weakened to a Category 2 hurricane overnight, but forecasters warned that it still packed a dangerous punch, 110 mile-an-hour (175 kph) winds and torrential rains.
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Police block a road as rain from Hurricane Florence falls in Wilmington, North Carolina on September 13, 2018. Hurricane Florence edged closer to the east coast of the US Thursday, with tropical-force winds and rain already lashing barrier islands just off the North Carolina mainland. The huge storm weakened to a Category 2 hurricane overnight, but forecasters warned that it still packed a dangerous punch, 110 mile-an-hour (175 kph) winds and torrential rains.