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Sat 14 Apr 2007 04:53 PM

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Burj Dubai is expected to break the concrete record

The Burj Dubai - set to be the world's tallest building - will break the world record for the highest vertical distance of pumped concrete within the next few months, according to developer Emaar Properties.

The Burj Dubai - set to be the world's tallest building - will break the world record for the highest vertical distance of pumped concrete within the next few months, according to developer Emaar Properties.

Greg Sang, assistant director - projects (Burj Dubai), Emaar Properties, said that he is confident that the record for pumping concrete vertically, which currently stands at 448m, will be broken by the Burj Dubai. The present record is held by the 508m-tall Taipei 101 building in Taiwan.

To date, 267,426m3 of reinforced concrete and 49,684 tonnes of reinforcing steel have been used in the construction of Burj Dubai, the final height of which has still not been officially revealed.

Sang has worked on the Burj Dubai project for two-and-a-half years and previously was part of the team constructing the tallest building in HongKong, the 420m-high Two International Finance Centre.

"It's always exciting to create landmark buildings; something which becomes an icon for a city," he said.

"I'm lucky in the sense that my work involves creating something physical, and I get a great sense of satisfaction from being able to look back at a project and recall that I was involved in its creation."

He added that the usual surveying techniques of using lasers to monitor the verticality of the structure were not viable in the case of the Burj Dubai - due to a laser's limit of 500m - so the construction team used GPS for this purpose.

And the team is using airlocks to combat the ‘chimney effect', which typically affects very tall buildings with high contrasts between interior and exterior temperatures. If left unremedied, the cool air inside the building during Dubai's hot summer months would sink creating high pressure at the bottom and causing problems such as stuck doors and whistling sounds; but airlocks prevent this by controlling airflow.

He also said that the design pressures for the glass façade of the Burj Dubai was determined by rigorous wind-tunnel testing, which involved placing a model of the building fitted with pressure sensors onto a turntable in a wind tunnel.

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